Social and Behavioral Sciences courses

SBS 100: Human Biocultural Evolution

Students are introduced to science as a method of studying and understanding human biology from an evolutionary perspective. Examines the foundations of life and evolutionary theory and the principles of genetics, human adaptation, and primate behavior. Explores the fossil record of human biocultural evolution over the last sixty million years. Students will also consider the anthropological understanding of the concept of human "races" today.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 101: Introduction to Anthropology

This course is a general introduction to the discipline of Anthropology and its distinct sub-fields. Anthropology is the study of the human experience; as such, it explores four major areas with emphasis on social and cultural dimensions. The course explores the central importance that the comparative approach has had in each of the sub-fields.

Units: 3 — 4

SBS 111: Reading and Writing US History

Examines US history through multiple and diverse perspectives. Introduces students to college-level reading and writing through an exploration of and student responses to written and visual source materials covering the history of the US from pre-contact Native America to 1877. Further develops reading, writing and communication skills through a focus on multicultural perspectives. Central themes include race relations, class, ethnicity, and gender.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 113: Women and Social Change in the United States, 1890-Present

Examines women's roles in causing and influencing social change in United States history, 1890 to the present. Focus will be American women's impact on United States and California societies, national, global, and multi-ethnic social change, and political and constitutional issues.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 195: Special Topics

Student and faculty member select lower division topics of study and the total number of credit hours. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 197: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and total number of credit hours.

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 200: Communication Skills: Applications in Social Science and Global Studies

Students develop critical thinking, listening, speaking, reading and writing skills using concepts and current issues in the social sciences and global studies. Through participating in class-based workshops on writing mechanics, reading scholarly and creative works, and writing literature reviews, students develop their reading comprehension and writing skills. (Prereq: CAD 95: Integrated Reading Writing (4 units) or EPT4 with Score of 147 or Higher)

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 212L: Teaching & Learning Lab

Optional lab for SBS 212: US Social Histories and Politics (4 units), Social and Political Histories of the U.S. Provides opportunities for students to focus in depth on one or more topics or themes covered in SBS 212: US Social Histories and Politics (4 units).

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 212: US Social Histories and Politics

Students acquire knowledge of diverse peoples and politics of the United States in historical and contemporary social contexts through collaborative explorations of the intersections of race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and environment. They develop the skills to become their own historians, and to effectively use the tools of political action reflecting knowledge of the constitutions and political systems of California and the United States.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 230: Crime and Violence

Examines the social and psychological foundations of violence and aggression in the context of cross-cultural perceptions of violence explored by way of a variety of martial arts styles and programs. Reviews the interrelationships obtaining between intellectual, psychological, spiritual, aesthetic, and physical health as it applies to one's life through the philosophy of the martial arts. Provides an interdisciplinary review of the sources of social and interpersonal violence. Formerly known as SBSC 230.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 231: Crime and Violence Self Defense

When completed, a passing grade will represent student achievement of the integration of psychological, physiological, and sociological domains across the lifespan as they relate to the safety of self and community. Students learn through lecture and vigorous physical activity about society wide patterns of crime and violence, with information drawn from behavioral science and praxis. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 3 — 3

SBS 244: Latino USA:Ident/Experiences

Examines and compares the political experiences, cultural practices, and literary expressions of diverse Latino populations in the U.S. Topics include immigration, citizenship, demographics, work, religion, education, language, gender, and cultural rights. Readings include ethnographies, histories, novels, and films. Students design political projects.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 245: Native American Societies

Examines Native American societies and cultures in North America, more precisely, the geographic areas of Mexico, the United States and Canada. Emphasizes the development of Native Americans and their societies over time, their influence on North America and the broader global community, and Native Americans & relationship with US political and social institutions. Gender, identity, and comparative indigenous world views will be central themes.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 252: Wrl/Reg/Geo/Cul/Soc/Sp:On-line

Applies a geographical perspective to the study of environment, culture, human societies, and their interactions. Examines world regions using a thematic approach to population, language, religion, economic development, social customs, urbanization, and resource problems. Focuses on spatial concepts, principles, and contemporary issues. Formerly known as SBSC 252.

Units: 3 — 3

SBS 284S: Cult/Contexts/Bilingual/Educat

(Coreq: 284L)

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 300: SBS Major ProSeminar: Theory

Students acquire a basic foundation in social and globalization theories and methods through exploration of current issues. Required entry into the Social and Behavioral Sciences major. (Credit/No Credit Available) [(Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (Coreq: SBS 300L: Professional Skills for the Social Sciences (1-2 units))]

Units: 3 — 4

SBS 300L: Professional Skills for the Social Sciences

Preparatory to advanced theory and research methods, students engage in hands-on practice to develop introductory skills and techniques for the social sciences. Students become conversant with common research methodology language, research design, and ethical considerations. Students begin preparation of a Graduation Portfolio, and complete an Individualized Learning Plan. (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Coreq: SBS 300: SBS Major ProSeminar: Theory (3-4 units))

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 304: California Indian Societies

California Indian Societies: This course examines California Indian Societies through the lenses of the Social Sciences. Students will be introduced to and discuss various historic and contemporary issues confronting California Native American tribal communities residing within urban and rural areas. Issues this course focus on include regional distinctions, gender roles and relations, inter- and intra-tribal relations, different historical eras and periods, economic systems, political systems, tribal relations with the state and the federal government, laws and policies, repatriation.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 306: Contemp American Indian Policy

Contemporary American Indian Policy: This course examines contemporary American Indian Policy from the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887 to the present day. Policy issues will include Indian-white relations, Self Determination, Termination, Relocation, Federal Recognition, NAGPRA, Indian responses to federal laws, Sovereignty, natural resources and economic development. Attention will be paid to reservation policies, urban issues, cultural resources and maintenance, and inter-tribal relations.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 310: Social Theory

Students gain first- hand knowledge of the main theorists and major schools of social theory over the last 100 years.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 313: Technical Writing Lab

This writing lab provides an essential introduction to technical or scientific writing for archaeologists and other social scientists. Though course content may vary, course objectives center on imparting those basic skills necessary for producing accurate technical descriptions, scientific reports, abstracts and annotations and clear and concise lab and field reports and written documentation.

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 315: Growth and Conflict in the United States to 1920

Examines the development of U.S. society, government institutions, and economic expansion from pre-contact Native America to 1920. Central themes focused on are race relations, political systems, social interactions, class, gender, and divergent points of view. Examines U.S. history through multiple disciplines and multi-cultural perspectives. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 316L: Visual Anthropology Lab

A practicum-based approach to those essential photographic skills and methods necessary for documenting objects, specimens, and human subjects from within a social sciences framework. Provides archaeology and other social sciences students with the necessary skills for producing effective images in film, print, and digital media. Specific methods addressed include studio and museum lighting, copy-work, and digital image manipulation for historic photo restoration and artifact reconstruction. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 1

SBS 317: Geography of the Global Econ

The global economy is a very complex system linking countries and regions through the trade and flow of goods, services, and information. Geographers are interested in how globalization affects the spatial arrangement of economic activities; how this arrangement affects local and national economies; and how local and national economies contribute to the form and function of the global economy.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 318: Tech Skills for the Social Sciences

Covers fundamentals of the current technology necessary for success in both academia and industry. Students attain competency in the use of software and electronic communication tools to analyze and manipulate data, and present research findings. Emphasizes using multimedia technologies in the context of the social and behavioral sciences, including Web page development and design, photographic image manipulation, and web-based portfolios. Formerly known as SBSC 318. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 320: Archaeology of Colonialism

Surveys the colonization of California from 1542 to 1848 from an ethnohistorical and archaeological perspective. Draws on firsthand accounts, primary documents, site visits to area missions, presidios, and adobes, and oral histories to explore the indigenous and colonial communities of California. Considers the consequences of colonial encounters and entanglements that shape contemporary interpretations of California¿s past.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 323: Southwestern Archaeology

Ancient peoples and places of the American Southwest frame this exploration of the archaeologists and explorers who trekked the landscapes of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah for archaeology and science. Ancestral Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest and their cultural legacies are central to this exploration of ancient towns. This survey of the archaeology of the American Southwest spans Paleo-Indian origins and sedentary agricultural villages, chiefdoms, and state-level societies. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 324S: Archaeology: From Map to Museum

Introduces methods, principles, and practices of lab and field archaeology, stressing strategy, interpretation, description, information management, archaeological technologies, and scientific inquiry. Lab and service learning options include museum exhibitions, multimedia development, on-site field excavations, analysis of artifacts from area missions, historic ceramics and lithics analysis, or "garbology". Required lab co-requisite: SBS 324L: Experimental Archaeology Lab (1-2 units): Experimental Archaeology. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (Coreq: SBS 324L: Experimental Archaeology Lab (1-2 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 324L: Experimental Archaeology Lab

A lab or practicum devoted to experimental archaeology projects ranging from modern material culture or garbology studies through to the reduction and manufacture of lithics and stone tools. Required lab course for SBS 324S: Archaeology: From Map to Museum (4 units). (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Coreq: SBS 324S: Archaeology: From Map to Museum (4 units))

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 324: Archaeology in Practice

Introduces methods, principles, and practices of lab and field approaches used by archaeologists. Explores how scientific inquiry and cultural resource management approaches contribute to our understanding of the human past. Students will learn how archaeologists reconstruct and interpret the lives of past peoples through the use of archaeological case studies, multimedia, and hands-on activities.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 325: Art of the Aztec Empire

The Aztec, or Aztlaneca Mexica, took to capturing and collecting the art and culture of all those domains that they conquered and subjugated. As a result, Aztec art, thought, and culture reflect an eclectic mixture of the many peoples and cultures of the empire. Explores the origins, art, language, and culture of a Mesoamerican civilization that was unique for its emphasis on human heart excision, but exclusively Mesoamerican in its art, architecture, and ideology. Formerly known as SBSC 325.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 328: Social Science Theory Module

Emphasizes in-depth theory-based analyses of topics and themes shared across the social sciences, but within special theoretical frameworks and paradigms of two disciplines. Specific disciplinary frameworks vary based on the disciplines of faculty teaching the course. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 329: Psychology of Health

An overview of health issues, and different theoretical perspectives of the biological, behavioral, and social factors that influence health and health management. Health psychologists focus on prevention of illness and promote wellness through research and clinical interventions designed to foster good health and to reduce the risk of disease. Health psychology emphasizes the biopsychosocial model for prevention.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 330: Crime and Violence

Examines the social and psychological foundations of violence and aggression in the context of cross-cultural perceptions of violence explored by way of a variety of martial arts styles and programs. Reviews the interrelationships obtaining between intellectual, psychological, spiritual, aesthetic, and physical health as it applies to one's life through the philosophy of the martial arts. Provides an interdisciplinary review of the sources of social and interpersonal violence. Formerly known as SBSC 330.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 331: Crime and Violence Self Defense

This is a self-defense course that teaches physiological, and sociological domains across the lifespan as they relate to the safety of self and community. Students learn through lecture and vigorous physical activity about society wide patterns of crime and violence and methods of defense. The course is useful for juniors and seniors preparing for careers in law enforcement, public safety, social work, or counseling professions where victims of violence are common.

Units: 2 — 2

SBS 332: The Rise & Fall of Civilizations

Explores the origins of human cultural development spanning the rise of civilization and the modern state. The domestication of plants and animals, early village life, the development of metallurgy and the arts, the origins of writing and the earliest dynastic traditions, and the rise of urbanism and the state in Africa, the Middle East, China, India, Europe, and the Americas.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 333L: Forensic Anthropology Lab

The Forensic Anthropology Lab provides students with a hands-on approach to the study of human skeletal anatomy and forensic methods and approaches. While each lab will focus on hard or skeletal anatomy, both perimortem and post-mortem indications from both hard and soft anatomy will guide our examination of the coldest cases on record.

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 333: Forensic Anthropology

This course combines cold case studies from archaeology, forensics, and biological anthropology in the analysis of the signs for blunt force trauma, strangulation, projectile wounds, dismemberment, disease, conflict-related violence, cannibalism, and mass murder. Peri-mortem and post-mortem indications from hard and soft anatomy underpin our examination of the coldest cases. The Forensic Anthro Lab is a practicum to SBS 333: Forensic Anthropology (1-4 units), and is a hands-on approach to the study of human skeletal anatomy.

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 334: Anthropology and Praxis

Reviews contemporary scholarship on anthropological research and praxis. Students actively participate in the discussion of assigned readings, and in the review and edition of a peer-reviewed online journal Culture, Society and Praxis. Students collaborate in the organization of at least one event (praxis) during the semester at the campus level. Meets Major Learning Outcomes 1 and 3 and is a required course for the Anthropology Concentration. Recommended for upper level division students.

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 335: Digital Ethnographies

This course explores interdisciplinary studies of virtual communities, with a particular emphasis on emerging work by cultural anthropologists. While emphasizing theoretical approaches to understand new social spaces, students participating in this course will learn how to apply ethnographic methodologies to study communities based on new media social networks as well as the visible manifestations of generational divides, creation of new linguistic spaces. (Prereq: SBS 101: Introduction to Anthropology (3-4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 336: Advan/Topics/Cult/Anthro

Provides in-depth understanding of cultural anthropology. Introduces students to contemporary issues being discussed in cultural anthropology and subdisciplines such as economic, political, and social anthropology. Reviews selected perspectives such as structuralism and symbolic, interpretive, developmental, Marxist, feminist, transnational, and visual anthropology. Explores the concept and changing meaning of "culture" as the central paradigm in anthropological analysis. Formerly known as SBSC 336.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 337: Global Travel and Tourism

This course examines the history, significance, and outcomes of global travel and tourism.  Students analyze the development and growth of travel and tourism with global, regional and local case studies to consider impacts on biological and cultural diversity and issues of authenticity and representation of people and places.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 338: Social Psychology

Examines various psychologies and sociologies, and identifies theoretical and methodological similarities between them. From a psychological paradigm, derives shared meanings about the interpretation of the Self. And, from a sociological paradigm reaches an understanding of the role of Self in society, as well as the role society has on shaping the Self. Students experience a set of tasks that allow them to discover the "role of the other." Offered both in-class and online. Formerly known as SBSC 338.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 340: Cross/Cult/Human/Develop

Examines psychological and social development using a multicultural perspective. Students engage in ethical reflection and practice through self-assessment and examination of those with different backgrounds. Explores interrelations among the personal, cognitive, and social development of the individual. Students learn the basic concepts and applications of counseling psychology and demonstrate cross-cultural competence in basic counseling skills through applied learning and experimental work. Formerly known as SBSC 340.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 345: Cultural Anthropology

Examines the concept of culture as key to an understanding of the diversity and depth of the human experience. Emphasizes the comparative approach as a method to understanding cultural identity and the underpinnings of the relationships of power, equity, and social justice. The connections between informal and formal relations of power are in turn reviewed. Students will recognize and compare diverse approaches to ethical decision making in the context of the understanding of culture. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 348: Maya Civilization

Examines the art, ideology, society, and culture of the ancient Maya dynastic tradition in comparative and cross-cultural terms and from the perspective of landmark archaeological projects, ethnohistorical studies, and glyph interpretation. Studies their respective significance in deciphering the larger Maya life way. Will review recent advancements in Maya glyph translation, astronomy, calendrical computation, as well as the literary, artistic, and historical traditions as conveyed through ancient texts and monuments.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 350: Domination and Resistance: US since 1880

Students acquire knowledge of systems of power and resistance movements in the U.S. since 1880. They develop the ability to use contemporary critical theories of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and ecology for understanding conquests, colonial power, imperialism, and resistance to domination. Satisfies state requirement in recent U.S. history for teaching credential subject matter preparation. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A2 and A3)]

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 350L: Domination/Resistance Lab

Optional lab for SBS 350: Domination and Resistance: US since 1880 (4 units), Domination and Resistance: US since 1880. Provides opportunities for students to focus in depth on one or more topics or themes covered in SBS 350: Domination and Resistance: US since 1880 (4 units). (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Coreq: SBS 350: Domination and Resistance: US since 1880 (4 units) or SBS 397: Independent Study (1-8 units))

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 352: On-line:Wrl/Reg/Geo/Cul/Soc/Sp

Applies a geographical perspective to the study of environment, culture, human societies, and their interactions. Examines world regions using a thematic approach to population, language, religion, economic development, social customs, urbanization, and resource problems. Focuses on spatial concepts, principles, and contemporary issues. Formerly known as SBSC 352.

Units: 3 — 4

SBS 353: Race, Class and Gender in the American West

Explores the intersection of race, class, and gender in the American West in cultural, social, and political contexts. Examines the American West as a multi-ethnic region; the intersection of race, class and gender; and the impact of labor on diverse communities in that region. Central to the course are issues of power relationships, racial and gender equity, paid and unpaid labor, social and political movements, urbanization, and environmental changes. (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2)

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 355: Archaeologic/Thought/Americas

Provides a small-group forum for the consideration of key anthropological theories and methods that inform contemporary archaeological thought and practice in the Americas. This intellectual history of American archaeology addresses essential social science theories and applications that dominate American archaeology and cultural resource studies. Primary themes and topics include evolutionary, environmental, structural, functional, economic, processural and post-processual approaches and applications. Required for all SBS majors in concentrations in archaeology and museum studies.

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 356: People, Places, & Environment: An Introduction to Geography

Using the latest instructional technology, introduces scientific principles of modern geography. Features both the cultural and environmental aspects of geography at global, regional, and local levels. Teaches perspectives that go beyond a concern with "where things are," providing discussion and analysis of basic geographical theories and methods in the context of case studies. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 360S: Mission Archaeology

An archaeology lab and field program that places students on the front lines and in archaeological investigation in Mission era sites of the California central coast. Ethnohistorical and archival research methods permits students to explore firsthand issues in Mission studies. Students will undertake an archaeological excavation in missions or Contact era indigenous settlements. Lab and field options include the study of archaeological and historical collections related to Mission archaeology. [(Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing) and (Coreq: SBS 360L: Archaeology Lab (1 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

SBS 360L: Archaeology Lab

An archaeology lab practicum or hands-on study of authentic artifacts and specimens recovered from past or ongoing archaeological investigations on the California central coast. Specific projects vary. Current analysis is centered on California Indian and Spanish colonial specimens, including bone, stone tools, ceramics, glassware, metal works, and military hardware recovered from early California mission and presidio contexts. Required for all students participating in SBSC 360S or other lab and field archaeology projects offered through the CSUMB Institute of Archaeology. (Coreq: SBS 360S: Mission Archaeology (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

SBS 361: Introduction to GIS

Provides an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in the context of social and behavioral sciences. Covers basic GIS concepts as well as mapping applications across disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, political science, and sociology. Students learn to examine the patterns and processes of social, economic, political, and cultural features on Earth's surface with the assistance of GIS technology. (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Coreq: SBS 361L: Introduction to GIS Lab (1-2 units))

Units: 3 — 4

SBS 361L: Introduction to GIS Lab

This is a required lab course for SBS361. It gives students opportunities to learn GIS software and to work on real world GIS projects. (Credit/No Credit Available) (Coreq: SBS 361: Introduction to GIS (3-4 units))

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 362: Rsrch Mthd for SBS: Qual Emph

This course presents various research methods, primarily qualitative and some quantitative methods. It explores different paradigms and appropriate methodologies. It allows students to engage in the whole research process of research design, data collection and data analyses in the social sciences. Students learn how to make professional presentations of findings. (Coreq: 362L)

Units: 3 — 3

SBS 362L: Rsrch Mthd SBS: Qual Emph Lab

This lab trains students in the systematic management of qualitative data. Students learn and practice the use of qualitative data collection and analysis software such as NVIVO8. Students learn how to use the software to organize, categorize, codify and report on data of primarily qualitative nature. (Coreq: SBS 362: Rsrch Mthd for SBS: Qual Emph (3 units))

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 363: Historical Methods

Examination of Historical Methods. This course immerses students in the ways that Historians develop work in their fields, create a written narrative, use sources, and become professional historians. Students engage the historical method through research, writing, oral communication, and analysis. (Credit/No Credit Available) (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 365: Black/Civil/Rights:1954-1968

Examines the Black Civil Rights Movement of the South during the 1950s and 1960s in the larger context of Black struggles for justice throughout the Twentieth Century. The centerpiece of the course is a 12-day tour of key places in the Civil Rights Movement in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Participants will see social movements in their historical, social and geographical contexts. (Coreq: SBS 365L: Black/Civil/Rights Lab (1-4 units))

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 366: Research Methods for SBS: Quantitative Emphasis

This class uses multi-method approach to explore different paradigms and appropriate quantitative and some qualitative methodologies. Students engage in the research process: research design, hypothesis testing, data collection, data analysis and presentation of findings in written and oral formats. Students practice selecting appropriate research methods given different types of data. They can pilot test part of their capstone projects. [(Prereq: STAT 100: Introduction to Statistics (4 units)) and (Coreq: SBS 366L: Research Methods for SBS: Quantitative Emphasis Lab (1-2 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

SBS 366L: Research Methods for SBS: Quantitative Emphasis Lab

Research Methods for SBS: Quantitative Emphasis Lab - Students get hands-on practices on projects that they select, formulate the research question and hypotheses, collect the data (using survey, observation, interviews, databases, archival resources, and content analysis), and analyze data (using descriptive and inferential statistics). Students will learn how to use a valuable, powerful and marketable computer software, SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Science), to analyze small and large datasets, as well as presenting the findings in a professional manner. (Coreq: SBS 366: Research Methods for SBS: Quantitative Emphasis (3 units))

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 369: Ed for Leadership/Public Servi

Student leaders from each of the 23 California State University campuses examine politics and public service life in politics. Explores theories and strategies to attract thoughtful men and women to lives of public service in politics, to inspire them to a high standard of conduct, and to equip them with the practical skills of self-government. Formerly known as SBSC 369.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 370: App/Research/Writing/Soc/Sci

Prepares students to apply social science theories and research methods to the writing and presentation of research papers in the social sciences. Students prepare written projects for presentation in an undergraduate research conference and/or for publication in an undergraduate research journal. Formerly known as SBSC 370.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 371: Applications/GIS/Soc/Scie/Busi

Academic and business communities are rapidly becoming major users of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. Introduces the fundamentals of GIS-supported social science and business applications. Provides students with hands-on experience solving common social and business problems with innovative GIS technology. Some examples are census data analysis, city and regional planning, crime mapping, business site selection, and marketing analysis and social science education for K-12 schools. Formerly known as SBSC 371.

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 378: Revolution and People Power in the Modern World

Students acquire knowledge of revolutions and people's mass movements for justice and human rights in the context of global developments since the start of the 20th century. Through specific case studies, they develop the analytical skills to understand how and why movements have succeeded or failed.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 379: Tattoos, Makeup and Burkas

Tattoos Makeup and Burkas: This course provides students with an introduction to the western and non-western anthropological literature and film on cultural elements of distinction across cultures of the world. People all around the world use tattoos, piercing and makeup and dress codes are symbolic tools to represent their ideas of self, gender or as a means of gender, ethnicity, and class control domination. This course will challenge students to understand this phenomenon as a universal one, and to explore its ethical dimensions, fostering the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for them to recognize, and analyze the ethical problems inherent to symbolic representations of self, gender and power explored in the course. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 381: US in Vietnam and Asia-Pacific: Peoples, Colonization, Conflicts, Resources

Analyzes the relations of the United States to Asia Pacific, especially Vietnam and the Philippines, from social, political-economy, cultural and historical perspectives. Key themes include colonization, conflicts, and resource exploitation in the Asia Pacific. Examines significant ethical concerns drawing from guest speakers, official documents, memoirs, fiction, poetry, films, photography, public and visual arts, and music.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 382: History of Modern Africa

Highlights the changing relationship of African societies to the larger world since about 1500 with a particular focus on the 20th century. Deals with Africa and the world of the Atlantic Slave Trade, the world of European expansion and colonial rule, the world of anti-colonial struggles, and the world of nation-building and development. Focuses on the lives of African peoples and the societies they have created.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 383: African Civilizations

A comparative survey of the ancient arts, cultures, and civilizations of sub-Saharan or Black Africa and Egypt. Reviews the archaeology and history of the spectacular civilizations of sub-Saharan African and their economic, technological, and cultural impact on the Middle East, Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Egypt, Axum, Meroe, Zimbabwe, Benin, Kush, Zulu, and the East and West African kingdoms will constitute the primary case studies, while discussions will review the emergence of the African Iron Age, the Black Pharaohs of Egypt, the spread of Islam, and the origins of the Atlantic slave trade.

Units: 3 — 4

SBS 384L: Anthropology of Education Lab

A project-based learning lab taken in conjunction with SBS 384S: Anthropology of Education: Cultural Contexts of Bilingual Education (6 units) involving hands- on work with immigrant bilingual groups in U.S. and Mexican public schools. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 384S: Anthropology of Education: Cultural Contexts of Bilingual Education

Introduces the study of schooling in California making emphasis in the perspective of minority groups and explores the concept of transnational cultural experiences. Explores the cultural similarities and differences within such immigrant groups and compares the learning experiences of U.S. and Mexican teachers and their students. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 6 — 6

SBS 385: Environmental History of California

Applies theories of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and qualitative methodologies to study historical relationships between the human and nonhuman worlds of California. Focuses on past and present human societies and their respective relationships to the land. Explores the ways in which history can aid in understanding present-day policy issues. Formerly known as SBSC 385. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 3 — 4

SBS 385L: Democratic/Particip/Lrng/Lab

A project based learning lab in US and California politics and government with special emphasis on the intersections of environmental and social issues. It is linked to SBS 385: Environmental History of California (3-4 units), Environmental History of California. (Credit/No Credit Available) (Coreq: SBS 385: Environmental History of California (3-4 units))

Units: 2 — 2

SBS 386: Social/Pol/Hist/CA

Applies theories of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and qualitative methodologies to study historical relationships among the human populations of California. Focuses on past and present human societies and their respective systems of governance and politics. Explores the ways in which history can aid in understanding present-day policy issues. Formerly known as SBSC 386.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 387: Field Studies of Communist Experiment

This course examines the "communist experiment" in the 21st century by comparing and contrasting three communist countries, China, Vietnam, and Cuba. They all have close ties with the US and are facing dilemmas of transforming from central planning to socialist market economy, such as income inequality, financial instability and labor issues. Field trips and case studies in one of these countries will give students valuable real-life experiences to understand the class themes.

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 388: Crisis and Development in Mexican Society

Borrowing prominently from contemporary anthropological studies, this course explores the main issues confronting Mexican society today, from emigration to the United States, to the impact that globalization, drugs, crime and corruption has on indigenous and peasant communities. Students taking this course will be able to develop familiarity with main aspects of contemporary life in the different Mexican regions and the relevance of these issues in the US.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 395L: Special Topics Lab

Student and faculty member select upper-division topics of study and total number of credit hours. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 2

SBS 395: Special Topics

Student and faculty member select upper-division topics of study and total number of credit hours. Formerly known as SBSC 395. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 397S: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credit hours. Formerly known as SBSC 397S.

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and total number of credit hours. Formerly known as SBSC 397. (Credit/NoCredit Available)

Units: 1 — 8

SBS 400: Senior Capstone Seminar I

Students complete a capstone proposal and major elements of a graduation portfolio. The portfolio provides evidence that a student is making satisfactory progress toward meeting Major Learning Outcomes in Social Theory, Research Methods, a Social Science concentration, and Application. Required for all students seeking a baccalaureate degree in the social and behavioral sciences. (Prereq: SBS 300: SBS Major ProSeminar: Theory (3-4 units) and SBS 300L: Professional Skills for the Social Sciences (1-2 units) or SBS 308)

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 401: Sr/Capstone/Direct/Rdg I

Students may enroll with a capstone adviser (instructor consent only) and design and propose a capstone project usually in a field of study such as Anthropology, Archaeology, Geographic Information Systems, Political Economy, Social History and Sociology.

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 402: Senior Capstone Seminar II

Students complete a capstone and a graduation portfolio. The portfolio provides evidence that a student has met Major Learning Outcomes in Social Theory, Research Methods, a Social Science concentration, and Application. Required for all students seeking a baccalaureate degree in the social and behavioral sciences. [Prereq: SBS 300: SBS Major ProSeminar: Theory (3-4 units) and (SBS 300L: Professional Skills for the Social Sciences (1-2 units) or SBS 308) and SBS 400: Senior Capstone Seminar I (1-4 units) and (Coreq: SBS 405: Assessment Lab/Grad/Srs (1-4 units))]

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 403: Sr/Capstone/Direct/Rdg II

Students enroll with their capstone adviser (instructor consent only) for advice on completion of a capstone project usually in a field of study such as Anthropology, Archaeology, Geographic Information Systems, Political Economy, Social History and Sociology.

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 404S: Service Learning Capstone

Students meet with and faculty and community partners in supervised learning activities related to their capstone topic and complete a contracted number of off-campus service hours with the sponsoring agency. Geared to students interested in action-oriented research. Requires pre-approved individualized learning plan and/or capstone proposal. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (SBS 300: SBS Major ProSeminar: Theory (3-4 units) and SBS 300L: Professional Skills for the Social Sciences (1-2 units) and SBS 400: Senior Capstone Seminar I (1-4 units)) and (Coreq: SBS 405: Assessment Lab/Grad/Srs (1-4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 405: Assessment Lab/Grad/Srs

Students present their capstone research projects in a professional public setting. Students assemble and present evidence of completion of program requirements as determined by the approved Individualized Learning Plan. SBS majors entering the second semester of the Senior Capstone curriculum must enroll in this course. Requires pre-approved Individualized Learning Plan and/or Capstone proposal. [Prereq: SBS 300: SBS Major ProSeminar: Theory (3-4 units) and (SBS 300L: Professional Skills for the Social Sciences (1-2 units) or SBS 308) and SBS 400: Senior Capstone Seminar I (1-4 units) and (Coreq: SBS 402: Senior Capstone Seminar II (1-4 units))]

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 450: Congress/Intrnshp/Adm/Leg/Oper

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Participants examine administrative organization, methods, systems and procedures, problem solving, and systems analysis. Formerly known as SBSC 450.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 451: Congress/Intrnshp/Comm/Politic

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Students examine political processes by which public policy is formulated, adopted, and implemented; political activity; election of public officials; and the political organization of government. Formerly known as SBSC 451.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 452: Congress/Intrnship/Ldshp/Cmtee

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Participants examine the leadership of congressional committee operations and processes. Formerly known as SBSC 452.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 453: Congress/Intrnshp/Bud/Appropri

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Participants examine government budgets, budgetary process and analysis, intergovernmental fiscal relations, and monetary and fiscal policy. Formerly known as SBSC 453.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 454: Congress/Intrnshp/Role/Press

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Students examine the nature, extent, and influence of the press on the nation's governmental process. Formerly known as SBSC 454.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 475: Fort/Ord/Historical/Docs/Proje

A project-based exploration of the social history of Fort Ord. Students participate in the creation of an archive and virtual museum housed in the CSUMB Library. Activities include gathering letters, diaries, oral histories, photographs, and other documents and memorabilia from people who once lived on Fort Ord. Participants also inventory, catalog, and digitize the collected documents, and assist in building an online archive and museum. Formerly known as SBSC 475.

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 480: The Queretaro Project

Focuses on the history, culture, and economy of Mexican peasant society, and mestizo-Indian interaction in Querétaro, Mexico. Complements the study opportunities in Querétaro, Mexico program for SBSC students. Formerly known as SBSC 480.

Units: 2 — 4

SBS 480L: Ethno/Mexico/Queretaro Project

Optional lab for SBS 480: The Queretaro Project (2-4 units), The Queretaro Project. Provides opportunities for students to focus in depth on one or more topics or themes covered in SBS 480: The Queretaro Project (2-4 units). (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 485S: Global Citizenship: Applied Research and International Service Learning in Rural Communities

The ethnographic research and service learning course explores a variety of areas of knowledge that are critical to understanding rural communities in the global age, including the impact of globalization on local economies, the formation of transnational cultural identities, and the revitalization and decline of local cultures. Students reside in one local community of a rural area and, under supervision of the instructor, collect ethnographic field data, provide services to local communities. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 4 — 6

SBS 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Social & Behavioral Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

SBS 550: Congress/Intrnshp/Adm/Leg/Oper

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Participants examine administrative organization, methods, systems and procedures, problem solving, and systems analysis. Formerly known as SBSC 550.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 551: Congress/Intrnshp/Comm/Politic

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Students examine political processes by which public policy is formulated, adopted, and implemented; political activity; election of public officials; and the political organization of government. Formerly known as SBSC 551.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 552: Congress/Intrnshp/Ldshp/Cmtee

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Participants examine the leadership of congressional committee operations and processes. Formerly known as SBSC 552.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 554: Congress/Intrnshp/Role/Press

Students are assigned to the office of a U.S. Representative who is a member of the California congressional delegation in Washington D.C. and spend a semester participating firsthand in American government. Students examine the nature, extent, and influence of the press on the nation's governmental process. Formerly known as SBSC 554.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 569: Ed for Leadership/ Public Service

Student leaders from each of the 23 California State University campuses examine politics and public service life in politics. Explores theories and strategies to attract thoughtful men and women to lives of public service in politics, to inspire them to a high standard of conduct, and to equip them with the practical skills of self-government.

Units: 4 — 4

SBS 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Social & Behavioral Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

SBS 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and total number of credit hours. Formerly known as SBSC 597.

Units: 1 — 6