Course Descriptions

Biology

BIO 106: Introduction to Plant Science

Introduction to plant science including structure, growth processes, propagation, physiology, growth media, biological competitors, and post-harvest factors of food, fiber, and ornamental plants.  Includes lecture and laboratory components. 

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 131: Bioethics

This course equips students to interpret and critically assess the basic problems, methods, and approaches to the field of bioethics, and familiarizes the students with the main ethical theories of bioethics.  Through a combination of readings, videos, other media and classroom exercises students learn to identify and comprehend the philosophical components of the public discussion on bioethical issues and appreciate the importance of ethical dialogue across different cultures and traditions. Through the use of interpersonal and small group discussions and presentations, students will understand the legal and public policy implications of bioethics and become able to understand the interplay of morality and law both at a general level and in relation to specific bioethical issues.

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 148: Introduction to Animal Training

Explores the field of animal training from a psychological and a technical perspective. Provides a theoretical background in relevant animal behavior and psychological principles related to the practical goal of modifying captive animal behavior. Topics include the history and ethics of animal use and training, and practical animal training techniques. Students intern at least one day at Moss Landing Marine Labs assisting in the care and training of research-trained sea lions. Fee charged for course materials. (Offered through Extended Education.)

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 196: Biology Introductory Research Practicum

This course engages students in locally-relevant research and introduces them to the research process. Through hands-on lab and/or field work, students develop proficiency in sampling, surveying, and analysis techniques, and gain understanding of the foundations and conventions of biological research. Students will also learn the importance of and explore opportunities for academic and career development in the sciences.  This course may require field trips on weekends and dates when classes are not normally in session.

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 204: Introduction to Life Science

An introduction to biomolecules, the structure and function of living cells, cell cycle, reproduction, evolution, and the diversity of organisms. Designed for Liberal Studies majors and science majors who need additional biology background to succeed in majors-level biology courses. (Prereq: GE Area B4 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology

First semester of a two-semester core biology series. Examines cell structure and function; cellular respiration and photosynthesis; cell signaling and reproduction; transmission and molecular genetics, transcription and translation; control of gene expression; biotechnology; comparative animal form and function; animal development. Enrollment conditional upon pre-assessment score, AP Biology exam score 4, or completion of BIO 204: Introduction to Life Science (3 units). Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) allowed if A- in CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units). [(Prereq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab (1 units) or prior completion)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab

The goals for this laboratory course are to develop a sound understanding and practice of laboratory safety and laboratory science, to expose students to the major techniques used in molecular biology laboratories, and to gain hands-on experience exploring the form and function of major animal organ systems. This course may have a lab fee. (Coreq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants

This is the second semester of the two-semester core biology sequence. Examines the diversity of life, the evolutionary processes that unites all life, the form and function of higher plants, and the ecological processes that govern the interactions of living and non-living components of the earth. These concepts will be grounded in an exploration of local biology and global climate change. [(Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) and (GE Area A1) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab

Required lab course for BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units). Focuses on biodiversity, evolution, plant biology and doing scientific research in ecology and plant physiology. Lab course fee may be charged. (Coreq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 230: Environmental Biology

This course focuses on the conservation of biodiversity, evolutionary processes that affect conservation and restoration, and the ecological concepts that underlie many environmental issues. These concepts will be grounded in issues in sustainability with a focus on climate change. In addition, the systems nature of environmental issues will be woven through the course. Lab course fee may be charged. [(Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and B4) and (CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units) or CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units) or ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science (4 units) or FYS 124: Introduction to Environmental Science (4 units) or GEOL 210: Introduction to Earth Science (3 units) or ENVS 282: Mtry Bay:Case Sty Env Sci &Pol (3 units) or PHYS 121: Integrated Physical Science (3 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 292: Professional Development for Scientists

This course is intended for students who will seek or are participating in undergraduate science internships. Students will explore opportunities for career development, create standard documents for applying to professional experiences, and develop their professional communication and networking skills. Students will also be introduced to campus services that support career development, including the Science Internship Program and the Career Development Center.

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 295: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 297: Independent Research

Student and faculty member select topic for research project. (Instructor consent required) 

Units: 1 — 2

BIO 301: Research and Technical Writing in Biology

Intended for biology majors, this course will develop skills in the written communication of biological information to the scientific community, emerging scientists, policy makers and to the general public. This course provides an introduction to bibliographic research, design/interpretation of experiments, visual presentation of results, and preparation of technical communications in biology. It is designed to enhance the skills of biology majors by focusing on those elements of research, interpretation, and written presentation that typically require considerable practice. [(Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better) AND (Coreq: BIO 320: Microbiology (4 units) or BIO 341L: Evolution and Population Genetics Laboratory (1 units) or BIO 340: Ecology (4 units))]

Units: 2 — 2

BIO 310: Biochemistry I

Covers biomolecular structure and function, biological oxidation and reduction, metabolism including respiration and photosynthesis, membrane transport, and biotransformation. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and (CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry for Biologists (4 units) or CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units) or CHEM 312: Organic Chemistry II (5 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 311: Genetics

This upper division course provides an in-depth, background in all areas of classic Mendelian genetics, population and evolutionary genetics, and molecular genetics. Students who successfully complete this course should be able to discuss and understand all of the above areas of genetics and have sufficient basic knowledge to successfully move on and master advanced topics in genetics. These outcomes will be achieved by learning how geneticists solve problems and make new discoveries. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better) and (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and 210L) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 320: Microbiology

Introduces the biology of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi), their significance as model systems for understanding fundamental cellular processes, and their role in human affairs. Also introduces the biological properties of bacterial and animal viruses, replication, methods of detection, interactions with host cells and multicellular hosts. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 322: Plant Pathology

Explores the biology and control of plant pathogens including fungi, bacteria, viruses, and nematodes. Topics covered will include differences in pathogen morphology, the phylogenetics of plant pathogens, host plant resistance, and the epidemiology of plant pathogens. Course fee may be required. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 332: Plant Physiology

Plant Physiology focuses on the structure and function of plants throughout their development from seeds through reproduction. Covers special plant adaptations, plant symbiotic relationships, hormones, nutrition, and biotic and abiotic plant stressors. Discussions and exercises will cover from the biochemical level through the organismal level with many practical examples in agricultural and ecological settings. (Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 340: Ecology

Introduces ecological concepts and theory by exploring the marine and terrestrial ecosystems of Monterey Bay. A systems approach teaches how organisms interact with one another and with the natural world around them. Emphasizes population, community, and ecosystem level ecology. [Prereq: (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and (MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 341L: Evolution and Population Genetics Laboratory

Students will participate in laboratory activities, in silico and in vitro, that demonstrate evolutionary processes in action such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. Students will conduct an open-ended research project using an in silico instance of evolution. These activities will support learning in the lecture portion of BIO 341: Evolution Bio & Pop Genetics (3 units). [Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab (1 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units) with a C- or better]

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 341: Evolution Bio & Pop Genetics

Overview and explanation of evolutionary processes, ranging from microevolutionary changes in allelic frequency due to mutation, genetic drift, gene flow and natural selection to macroevolutionary processes such as speciation, extinction and the evolution of biodiversity. (Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 342: Plant Communities of CA

Surveys terrestrial ecosystems across California. Emphasizes the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the extents of these ecosystems. Plant identification and distribution in ecosystems of the Monterey Bay area. May include one or more weekend field trips. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 344L: Environmental Biotechnology Lab

Laboratory course covering techniques for prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA purification, amplification, subcloning, and sequence analysis, used in the context of providing earth systems information. Additional knowledge and skills acquired include microbial cell culture, primer design, proposal writing. Lab course fee may be charged. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab (1 units)) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 347: Working with Marine Mammals

Explores current topics and careers working with marine mammals. Topics include practical knowledge of captive marine mammal husbandry (care and maintenance), training, basic physiology, an overview of common research topics and techniques, as well as public display, education, and current issues in marine mammalogy. Students intern at least one day at Moss Landing Marine Labs assisting in the care. Requires completion of a college biology course. (Offered through Extended Education.) (Prereq: GE Area B2 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 356: Zoology Specimen Preparation

Preparation and care of animal specimens for museums/education. Students learn species identification, relaxation and wet preservation of marine invertebrates, pinning and mounting of insects, and preparation and preservation of salvaged mammals and birds for study skins. (Recommend prior completion of one or more of the following: BIO 345, BIO 360: Natural History of California Wildlife (4 units), BIO 362: Field Ornithology (4 units), BIO 364: Mammology (4 units), BIO 366, BIO 420: Marine Invertebrate Zoology (4 units), or BIO 448: Freshwater Ecology (4 units)) [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 2 — 2

BIO 360: Natural History of California Wildlife

Students learn about the ecology, evolution, and protection status of common or otherwise noteworthy mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish of central California. Lab/field components provide students with experience conducting wildlife surveys/research and aid development of field observation and identification skills. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) and ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 362: Field Ornithology

Field Ornithology introduces students to bird identification and field research techniques, and exposes them to broad concepts in avian biology. Lecture components of the course will cover avian diversity, evolutionary history, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Field and laboratory components of the course will train students in the practical application of standardized field methods, including census techniques, behavioral observations, and habitat measurements. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 364: Mammology

Concepts and skills related to the study of mammals. Lecture components (2 hours per week) will cover the origin, evolution, adaptation, biogeography, physiology, ecology, and behavior of mammals. Lab/field components (4 hours per week) will focus on the identification and classification of mammals and provide students with experience using standard field techniques to survey terrestrial mammals native to central California. Requires one or more weekend fieldtrips. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and 211L) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) and ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 378S: Health Sciences Service Learning

Through active work directly with people in medically underserved communities, students discover how class, ethnicity, language, and immigration status affect access to health care in the Monterey County. Through service, journaling, readings, and data analysis students will explore medical access issues and the factors that lead to social injustice and inequity. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 5 — 5

BIO 379S: Biology Service Learning

Addresses strategies for supporting equitable formal and informal educational opportunities and access to healthy natural environments for all, regardless of their cultural, linguistic, or economic background. Service learning placements in schools and other agencies help students deepen their understanding of basic biology principles and methodologies for facilitating learning by diverse students and community members. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 380: Practical Computing for Scientists

This course will focus on developing the base tool set for implementing advanced computing in the design and analysis of research projects. Content of the course is geared towards novice students (i.e. those with little or no previous programming experience) who will learn practical computational approaches to modern research questions by applying programming concepts and approaches to real data sets. Areas of study will focus on skills related to data manipulation, management, and analysis. [Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and [(BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and 211L) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units))] with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 392: Biology Seminar Series

Upper division seminar course based on lectures from visiting faculty and biology professionals from Research 1 institutions, biotechnology, and other biology-related careers. Includes reading and critical analysis of peer reviewed literature, seminar and journal club discussion, and attendance in seminar series. May be repeated for credit up to three times. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 394: Biology Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires biology skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better and Instructor Consent)

Units: 1 — 2

BIO 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 397: BIO Independent Research

Student and faculty member select topic for research project. (Instructor permission required)

Units: 1 — 2

BIO 410: Bioinformatics

This course emphasizes the integration of modern biological methods and research questions with the computationally intensive approaches necessary for analyzing the associated "Big Data". Students will gain a deeper understanding of topics such as molecular biology, evolution, probability, and computational tools by implementing genomic approaches to both applied and basic research fields in order to conduct bioinformatic analysis using data from genomic-scale research projects. [Prereq: (GWAR and BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) and BIO 380: Practical Computing for Scientists (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 412: Comparative Genomics

This course will explore the areas of genomics and comparative biology and their relationships to both basic and applied areas of research. Students will learn about the applications and contributions of a "genomic" perspective to topics such as evolutionary biology, functional genetics, genetic structure, and systems biology. [Prereq: (GWAR and BIO 311: Genetics (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 413: Molecular Genetics

A comprehensive molecular genetics course for majors covering DNA replication, repair and mutation, regulation of transcription and translation, and analysis and manipulation of genes at the molecular level. [Prereq: (GWAR and BIO 311: Genetics (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 414: Molecular Cell Biology

Cell structure, membrane transport, cell division, molecular genetics, recombinant DNA, mechanisms of evolution, and the basis of classification. Applies fundamental principles and experimental approaches in four areas of cell biology: cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, intracellular protein transport, and structure and function of cytoskeleton, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. Explores recent advances in the fields of molecular and cell biology. [Prereq: (GWAR and BIO 311: Genetics (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 420: Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Advanced survey of the biology of invertebrates, stressing comparative functional morphology, evolution, phylogeny, systematics, natural history, behavior, and aspects of physiology and development. Emphasizes the living animal and its habitat. [Prereq: (GWAR AND MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 421: Microbiology Research

This course is a group capstone course focused on compiling and analyzing the individualized student data collected in the prior semester of microbiology. This synthesized data will then be supported by an in-depth literature review that includes advanced topics in microbiology relevant to the hypothesis being explored. The work will be presented to a broader audience in written and/or oral formats. [Prereq: (GWAR and BIO 300 and BIO 320: Microbiology (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 425: Systematic and Molecular Mycology

Examines the diverse world of fungi in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungi are ecologically and economically important decomposers, symbionts and pathogens. Introduces current fungal research topics (e.g. pathogenicity) and explore both next generation sequencing technologies for the analysis of fungal diversity, growth and virulence mechanisms. [(Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) AND (BIO 320: Microbiology (4 units) OR BIO 322: Plant Pathology (4 units)) AND GWAR) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 430: Marine Experimental Physiology

This course uses a group project approach to address a real-world marine environmental physiology problem. This course will increase knowledge retention and integration of concepts in marine science, physiology and biology, and teach students what it is like to work in a research laboratory setting. Includes group capstone project option. [(Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (MSCI 331: Ecological Physiology (4 units) or BIO 330: Vertebrate Physiology (3 units)) and GWAR) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 444: Molecular Ecology & Evolution

Students will learn to apply molecular laboratory and analytical methods to questions in the fields of ecology and evolution and use these methods to execute and present a research project. [Prereq: GWAR and (BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) or BIO 341: Evolution Bio & Pop Genetics (3 units) or MSCI 341: Conservation Genetics (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 448: Freshwater Ecology

In-depth exploration of freshwater and estuarine ecosystems, including aquatic organisms and their taxonomy; the ecology of freshwater ecosystems; and the influences of biogeochemistry, water quality, hydrology, and geomorphology on biota. The course focuses on applying ecological and chemical knowledge to assessing and managing freshwater ecosystems. Will include weekend or odd-hour field trips with concurrent field/laboratory section. [Prereq: BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and GWAR and (ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units) or ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 449: Community Ecology

This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of concepts examining how species interactions shape the structure and composition of plant and animal communities. Lecture covers topics on species interactions such as competition, predation, herbivory, and mutualism, as well as principle theories explaining coexistence and species diversity. Discussion explores classic and modern literature representative of research in the field, with an emphasis on communities in California. [Prereq: (GWAR and BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 461: Eukaryotic Molecular Biology

Advanced project-based lab and lecture course develops skills and understanding of current techniques in eukaryotic genetics and molecular biology. Six hours lab and two hours lecture per week. [(Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) with a C- or better) or (Coreq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 472: California Flora

Uses taxonomy and systematics of higher plants of California with a focus on morphology, development, and other characteristics to classify plants. [Prereq: (BIO 342: Plant Communities of CA (4 units) and GWAR) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 491: Biology Honors Capstone

Assists students in completing their biology research capstone project. These projects are independent in nature, and should be approved by the capstone course instructor and your research mentor prior to enrollment. The student's research mentor may have been on the CSUMB campus, or as a summer REU on another campus, or research at an associated research agency or institution. (Prereq: GWAR with a C- or better and Instructor Consent)

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 492: Course-Based Capstone

Assists students enrolled in a capstone project course in preparing their final written report, poster, and/or oral presentation for their Senior Capstone Project. Students must have completed an approved Biology Capstone Project Course prior to enrolling in BIO 492: Course-Based Capstone (1 units). [(Prereq: GWAR with a C- or better) and ((Prereq: BIO 461: Eukaryotic Molecular Biology (4 units) with a C- or better) or (Coreq: BIO 410: Bioinformatics (4 units) or BIO 412: Comparative Genomics (3 units) or BIO 425: Systematic and Molecular Mycology (4 units) or BIO 444: Molecular Ecology & Evolution (4 units) or BIO 461: Eukaryotic Molecular Biology (4 units)) ) ]

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 493: Biology Education Capstone

Provides a culminating Biology Education experience, which may include curriculum development, enhancement, and/or assessment.  Course should be taken after a education-related service learning experience.   [Prereq: GWAR and BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) and (BIO 341: Evolution Bio & Pop Genetics (3 units) or BIO 330: Vertebrate Physiology (3 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 494: Biology Capstone Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires advanced biology knowledge and skills, and synthesis of biology with other disciplines. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

BIO 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 497: Independent Research

Student and faculty member select topic for research project. (Prereq: Senior Standing) (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

BIO 510: Bioinformatics

This course emphasizes the integration of modern biological methods and research questions with the computationally intensive approaches necessary for analyzing the associated ¿Big Data.¿ Students will gain a deeper understanding of topics such as molecular biology, evolution, probability, and computational tools by implementing genomic approaches to both applied and basic research fields in order to conduct bioinformatic analysis using data from genomic-scale research projects. 

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 544: Molecular Ecology and Evolution

Students will learn to apply molecular laboratory and analytical methods to questions in the fields of ecology and evolution and use these methods to execute and present a research project.

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 548: Freshwater Ecology

In-depth exploration of freshwater and estuarine ecosystems, including aquatic organisms and their taxonomy; the ecology of freshwater ecosystems; and the influences of biogeochemistry, water quality, hydrology, and geomorphology on biota. The course focuses on applying ecological and chemical  knowledge to assessing and managing freshwater ecosystems. Will include weekend or odd-hour field trips with concurrent field/laboratory section.

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 549: Community Ecology

This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of concepts examining how species interactions shape the structure and composition of plant and animal communities. Lecture covers topics on species interactions such as competition, predation, herbivory, and mutualism, as well as principle theories explaining coexistence and species diversity. Discussion explores classic and modern literature representative of research in the field, with an emphasis on communities in California. [(Prereq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units)) or (Coreq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits. (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

Chemistry

CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry

A study of the basic principles of chemistry with special emphasis on problem solving and quantitative literacy, and biological and environmental applications of chemistry.  

Units: 3 — 3

CHEM 109L: Intro Chemistry Lab

Optional inquiry-based introductory chemistry lab can be taken concurrently or after CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units). (Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units) with a C- or better) 

Units: 1 — 1

CHEM 110: Chemistry I

Develops problem-solving skills related to the nature of matter, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, energy transformations, atomic and molecular structure, quantum theory, chemical bonding, and periodic properties. Students must complete an Introductory Chemistry course such as CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units),  or have a passing score on CSUMB's chemistry placement exam.  [(Prereq or Coreq: MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: CHEM 110L: Chemistry I Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

CHEM 110D: Supplemental Workshop for CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units)

Optional supplemental problem-solving workshop in an active-learning setting. Designed for students who have completed high school chemistry or introductory chemistry but want additional support to succeed in General Chemistry in an active-learning setting.    (Coreq: CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

CHEM 110L: Chemistry I Lab

Required lab course for CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units). Emphasizes qualitative and quantitative experiments, data analysis, and error propagation. Lab course fee may be charged. (Coreq: CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

CHEM 111: Chemistry II

Develops problem-solving skills related to solutions, phase changes, gas laws, thermodynamics, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, organic chemistry, biochemistry, electrochemistry, metal complexation, and nuclear chemistry. [(Prereq: (CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units) and CHEM 110L: Chemistry I Lab (1 units)) and (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: CHEM 111L: Chemistry II Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

CHEM 111L: Chemistry II Lab

Required laboratory course for CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units). Emphasizes qualitative and quantitate experiments, data analysis, and error propagation. Lab course fee may be charged. (Coreq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

CHEM 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Chemistry. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 0 — 4

CHEM 197: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry for Biologists

Survey of organic compounds, with an emphasis on biological processes. Nomenclature, structure in two and three dimensions, and reaction mechanisms are explored. Emphasizes structure and reactivity of common functional groups found in biomolecules, including carbohydrates and peptides. [(Prereq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: CHEM 210L: Survey of Organic Chem Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I

Nomenclature, structure, bonding, reactivity, and formation of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, and alcohols. Includes intro to spectroscopy. (Prereq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 5 — 5

CHEM 295: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Chemistry. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 310: Biochemistry I

Topics include bioenergetics, protein function; enzymes, DNA and RNA structure and function, glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, signal transduction, and regulation, bioinformatics. (Cross-listed BIO 310: Biochemistry I (3 units)) (Prereq: CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry for Biologists (4 units) or CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units) or CHEM 312: Organic Chemistry II (5 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

CHEM 312: Organic Chemistry II

Synthesis, reactions, and analysis of organic compounds, with applications to biology, biogeochemistry, and environmental science. (Prereq: CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 5 — 5

CHEM 320: Environmental Chemistry

Examines chemistry in seminal environmental science case studies with analysis of the primary literature and quantitative methods as well as pertinent popular literature and news coverage. Topics are selected to form a sound basis for meeting the expectations of potential employers in environmental science with respect to background knowledge of the field at large and include atmospheric, terrestrial, marine, and aquatic studies. (Prereq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

CHEM 320L: Environmental Chemistry Lab

Laboratory course with topics and techniques selected from atmospheric, terrestrial, marine, and aquatic sciences. Emphasis will be placed on both laboratory methods and quantitative analysis of results. [Prereq: (CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) and CHEM 111L: Chemistry II Lab (1 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) with a C- or better) or (Prereq or Coreq: CHEM 320: Environmental Chemistry (3 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 2 — 2

CHEM 350: Analytical & Instrumental Chemistry

Lecture and laboratory course develops skill and understanding of analytical chemistry and instrumental analysis. Covers a range of spectrophotometry, chromatography, spectrometry, and titrimetry methods. Students are billed a materials fee. (Prereq: (CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) and CHEM 111L) and [(CHEM 210 and CHEM 210L) or (CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

CHEM 394: Chemistry Internship

Students obtain practical experience in a chemistry-related (paid or unpaid) internship. Students must document academic learning through journals, annotated bibliography, and/or reports appropriate to the internship. May be repeated for credit for a total of six (6) units. (Graded Available)

Units: 2 — 4

CHEM 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Chemistry. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 410: Biochemistry II

Covers metabolism and regulation of a variety of biomolecules and transport and signaling pathways. (Prereq: CHEM 310: Biochemistry I (3 units) or BIO 310: Biochemistry I (3 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

CHEM 420: Bioorganic Chemistry Topics

Survey of selected topics from the current chemical literature in bioorganic chemistry. May be repeated for credit as topics change for a total of six (6) units. (Prereq: CHEM 310: Biochemistry I (3 units) or BIO 310: Biochemistry I (3 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 430: Environmental and Agricultural Chemistry Topics

Selected topics from the current literature in environmental, analytical, and agricultural chemistry. May be repeated for credit for a total of six (6) units. [Prereq: (CHEM 350: Analytical & Instrumental Chemistry (4 units)) and (CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry for Biologists (4 units) or CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 432: Aqueous Chemistry

Chemistry of molecules and materials in aqueous solutions relevant to marine, aquatic, and biological contexts. Topics may include pH and pOH, buffering, alkalinity, ionic strength, solvation and solubility, volume and mass fraction, osmolality and tonicity, and water activity. (Prereq: CHEM 310: Biochemistry I (3 units) or CHEM 320: Environmental Chemistry (3 units) or CHEM 350: Analytical & Instrumental Chemistry (4 units) or BIO 310: Biochemistry I (3 units) or BIO 320: Microbiology (4 units) or MSCI 331: Ecological Physiology (4 units) or ENVS 315: Soils and the Environment (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

CHEM 440: Forensic Chemistry Topics

Selected topics from the current literature in forensic chemistry. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. [Prereq: (CHEM 350: Analytical & Instrumental Chemistry (4 units)) and (CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry for Biologists (4 units) or CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 450: Special Problems in Chemistry Laboratory

Covers theory and practical application of instrumental methods of analysis, culminating in a faculty guided lab research project. Students submit a written report summarizing the research findings. May be repeated for a total of four (4) units. Depending on research topic, students must complete either CHEM 350: Analytical & Instrumental Chemistry (4 units) or BIO 310L: Biochemistry Lab (2 units) and or CHEM 312: Organic Chemistry II (5 units).

Units: 1 — 2

CHEM 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Chemistry. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Letter Grade Available)

Units: 1 — 4

CHEM 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

Environmental science

ENVS 101: Energy and Sustainability

This problem-based learning course consists of a series of independent projects that focus on the interaction between energy, sustainability, and the environment. Each project is designed as a hands-on, collaborative inquiry where students are presented with a challenge and key question. Each semester-long course consists of 3 to 6 of these projects. One project each semester is focused exclusively on solving a major challenge in the campus climate action plan.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 128: Introduction to Soil Science

The study of soil physical, chemical and biological properties..  Soil classification, derivation, use,function and management including erosion, moisture retention, structure, cultivation, organic matter and microbiology.  Laboratory topics include soil type, classification, soil reaction, soil fertility and  physical  properties of soil. Includes a weekly lab.  

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 196: Environmental Science Intro Research Practicum

This course engages students in locally-relevant research and introduces them to the research process. Through hands-on lab and/or field work, students develop proficiency in sampling, surveying, and analysis techniques, and gain understanding of the foundations and conventions of environmental science research. Students will also learn the importance of and explore opportunities for academic and career development in the sciences.  This course may require field trips on weekends and dates when classes are not normally in session.

Units: 1 — 2

ENVS 197: Independent Study

Independent study for first-year students. Students must obtain the signature/approval of their independent study supervisor before enrolling in ENVS 197: Independent Study (1-6 units).

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science

This interdisciplinary introduction to environmental science course introduces science as a method of studying and understanding the natural world through offering an overview of topics needed to understand key environmental challenges of today's world. Promotes critical thinking, problem solving, scientific and environmental literacy. For non-science majors and Environmental Studies majors.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 282: Mtry Bay:Case Sty Env Sci &Pol

Introduction to the major physical, chemical, biological, and geological features and processes of global oceanography, with emphasis on the Monterey Bay area. Discusses the human impacts on the region and the state and federal policies in-place that have been designed to protect the Monterey Bay area through the establishment of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. For non-science majors.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 284: Envi Econ & Management

Covers principles of microeconomics and applies these to environmental valuation and management of natural resources. Students apply economic theory to evaluate environmental problems and policies, particularly in marine and coastal ecosystems. [(Prereq: (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) and ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science (4 units) or FYS 124: Introduction to Environmental Science (4 units) and STAT 100: Introduction to Statistics (3 units)) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 2 — 2

ENVS 295: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Prereq: GE Area A1 with a C- or better)

Units: 1 — 4

ENVS 297: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic for research project. (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science

 Students develop written and oral communication and critical thinking skills in the context of writing a case study on a complex environmental issue.  The case study integrates science and  policy, and includes critical review and synthesis of relevant publications and literature, as well as the perspectives of diverse stakeholders, and stakeholder interviews.      [(Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 303: Calif Transect Orientation

Mandatory orientation for ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units). This classroom component of California Transect prepares students for the summer field course (ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units)) by introducing topics in California's scientific, cultural, and political history and current issues that will be examined in detail during the summer field course (ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units)). May require one weekend field trip. [Prereq: (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units))]

Units: 2 — 2

ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab

Two-week summer field course. Students explore California's unique ecosystems and landscapes using a case-studies framework emphasizing the interaction between natural processes and human impacts. Involves camping and hiking. Course fee charged for food, transportation, and camping. (Coreq: ENVS 303: Calif Transect Orientation (2 units))

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 307: Energy Solutions and Climate Change

The course helps students create their own knowledge and understanding of the many different factors that affect our current decision-making on generation and use of energy resources with a focus toward reducing energy and carbon intensity.  After a basic grounding in energy and sustainability science, students will be exposed to a series of guest lecturers to help them develop a more in-depth understanding of the non-technology forces at play such as culture, media, economics, and politics.   Students complete an original research paper that focuses on a specific local/regional industry that includes specific science-based recommendations on reducing carbon intensity.  A key take away from this course is that many of the technologies and techniques to reduce or even eliminate carbon intensity already exist and can be put to use.  (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and  A3 and B4 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 315: Soils and the Environment

Soils and the Environment: Lecture/lab course surveys the importance, composition, and formation of soils; soil chemistry, mineralogy, and organic matter; soil physical properties and water movement and retention; soil biology and microbiology; soil fertility and plant growth; reactions and movement of nutrients, trace metals, and pesticides in soils; factors influencing soil erosion and salinization; and soil taxonomy and surveys. [(Prereq: (ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or MSCI 300 or ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) or BIO 300) and GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS

Theory and application of spatial data acquisition, analysis, and display using an integrated, hands-on, project-based approach. Covers geographic information systems (GIS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Course completion results in GPS Mapping certification from Trimble Navigation. (Prereq: STAT 100: Introduction to Statistics (3 units) or STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods

Project-oriented course covers techniques in statistics, experimental design, and field methodology to characterize the ecological patterns in local ecosystems. Field-intensive course. [(Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)) and (STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units)) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: GWAR)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 355: Environmental Monitoring

Project-oriented course covers techniques in experimental design, data analysis, and field and laboratory methods of soil and water analysis in the context of local soil and water chemistry problems. May include one or more weekend field trips. [Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) or GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 370: Environmental Wildlands Studies

Environmental Wildlands Studies: Field investigations study of environmental problems affecting natural and human-impacted ecosystems, including the role of human interactions. Extended field study of flora, fauna, biotic communities, and ecological relationships at selected sites in the United States or international locations. Students participate in field research and evaluation of environmental policy options.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 371: Environmental Field Survey

Environmental Field Survey: Field based course that conducts onsite examinations and analyses of environmental problems affecting North American/international wildlands and wildlife populations. Concepts and principles of environmental studies, wildlife management and public land planning methods are incorporated during assessment of the study area's environmental characteristics. Data collection techniques, quantification and analysis of field data, and environmental report writing are components of the research activities that students will pursue.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 372: Wildlands Environment&Culture

Wildlands Environment&Culture: Field Studies course involves off-campus travel to a variety of locations, studying the relationships among people and the environment. Region and culture specific case studies and assessment of historical and current cultural and environmental uses of wildland and/or wildlife communities. Examination of consequences and outcomes of environmental policies and wildland/wildlife management.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 394: Environmental Science Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires critical thinking and specialized science, policy, or technical skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENVS 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Earth Systems Science & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

ENVS 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select a specialized research project. (Instructors Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENVS 402: Honors Capstone Seminar

Assists students in completion of faculty-guided Honors Capstone research project. Requires advisor-approved research proposal.   (Prereq: GWAR AND Senior Standing) (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 1

ENVS 410: Capstone Integration Seminar

Assists students enrolled in a capstone project course in preparing their final written report, poster, and/or oral presentation for their Senior Capstone Project. Students must enroll concurrently in an approved ESTP Capstone Project Course. [Prereq: (ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or BIO 300 or MSCI 300 or ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: ENVS 446: Landscape Ecology (4 units) or ENVS 475: Projects in Natural Resource Management (4 units) or BIO 448: Freshwater Ecology (4 units) or GEOL 460: River Hydrology, Assmt&Monitor (4 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

ENVS 436: Rmt Sns/Image Process

Applications of geospatial information technology and geodata manipulation and analysis in the management of natural resources, including remote sensing, aerial photography, image processing, georeferencing, georecertification, and quantitative information extraction from multispectral and other image data. (Prereq: ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 440: Environmental Modeling

Process of designing, building, and using computer models for use within applied environmental science. Covers key examples within ecological and hydrological modeling. Introduces students to different modeling paradigms, including: systems dynamics, statistical habitat selection, and simulated vs analytical solutions. Software usage draws from Stella, Excel, and the R programming language. Individual student projects. [(Prereq: MATH 151: Calculus II (4 units) and (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) or GEOL 360: Geomorphic Systems (4 units)) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 446: Landscape Ecology

Theory and methods of landscape-level research, analysis, and management. Methods for detecting and characterizing landscape patterns; causes of landscape patterns; mechanisms by which landscape patterns change through time; implications of landscape patterns for populations, communities, and ecosystems; strategies for conservation and management issues at a landscape scale. Students read, discuss, and analyze scientific literature in landscape ecology and apply the quantitative tools. [Prereq: (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units) or MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science (4 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 475: Projects in Natural Resource Management

Applied group capstone course focused on collecting and analyzing data to address natural resource management issues on local public lands. Course will include discussion of relevant regulations and management issues. Course may focus on ephemeral wetland, grassland, chaparral or dune ecosystems depending on the needs of local resource managers. Field-intensive course. [Prereq: (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units) and (ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units) or ENVS 355: Environmental Monitoring (4 units)) with a C- or better) and (GWAR)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 483: Environmental Impact Assessment

The theory and practice of environmental impact assessment and analysis. The process of preparing environmental documents (such as EAs, EISs, and EIRs) as mandated by state and federal statutes and regulations under NEPA and CEQA. Application of environmental assessment in urban, regional, and land use planning contexts. Processes of public participation and comment. Litigation and environmental mediation. [(Prereq: (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better) and (GWAR)) and (Coreq: ENVS 483L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab (1 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 483L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab

Field methods, sampling techniques, and visits to local projects that support environmental assessment. [(Prereq: (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) with a C- or better) and (GWAR)) and (Coreq: ENVS 483: Environmental Impact Assessment (3 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

ENVS 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select independent research project. (Prereq: Senior Standing) (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENVS 500: Environmental Policy and Management

This graduate seminar focuses on the complex relationship between science and environmental policy and management. It takes a case-study approach to understanding the process of developing and approving environmental policy, and in identifying and comparing major stakeholders, their interests, and their roles in the development and approval of policies that address current environmental problems.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 502: Scientific Writing

This graduate seminar assists students in developing scientific writing skills including thesis, research, and proposal writing.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 505: Current Topics in Environmental Science

Students read and dissect contemporary papers from the primary scientific literature.

Units: 2 — 3

ENVS 532: Advanced GIS&Spatial Analysis

Theory and application of advanced spatial data acquisition, analysis, and display using an integrated, hands-on, project-based approach. Use of geographic information systems (GIS) for spatial analysis, hypothesis testing, and decision making. Theory and practice of advanced GIS topics and methods such as raster analysis, dynamic segmentation, geocoding, spatial statistics, and geodatabase design.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 536: Remote Sns & Image Process

Applications of geospatial information technology and geodata manipulation and analysis in the management of natural resources, including remote sensing, aerial photography, image processing, georeferencing, georecertification, and quantitative information extraction from multispectral and other image data.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 540: Environmental Modeling

Teaches the process of designing, building, and using computer models for use within applied environmental science. Covers key examples within ecological and hydrological modeling e.g. population dynamics, and water flow. Introduces students to different modeling paradigms, including: systems dynamics, statistical habitat selection, and simulated vs analytical solutions. Software usage draws from Stella, Excel, and R programming language. Includes individual student projects.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 546: Landscape Ecology

Theory and methods of landscape-level research, analysis, and management. Methods for detecting and characterizing landscape patterns; causes of landscape patterns; mechanisms by which landscape patterns change through time; implications of landscape patterns for populations, communities, and ecosystems; strategies for conservation and management issues at a landscape scale. Students read, discuss, and analyze scientific literature in landscape ecology and apply the quantitative tools. [(Prereq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units)) or (Coreq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 550: Research Methods

Covers the key elements of applied scientific research, including data management, analytical software, scientific method, designing research questions, experimental design, statistical analysis & inference under multiple paradigms, communication of scientific results, and selected advanced analytical techniques. Emphasizes effective linkage between science and policy.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 560: Watershed Systems

Develops interdisciplinary skills to address complex environmental issues. Skill sets will be in the fields of hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, water quality, and ecology. Topics include environmental policy/agency framework, current environmental issues, and physical/ecological processes in natural and impacted watershed systems. May require weekend field trips.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 575: Projects in Natural Resource Management

Applied project-oriented course focused on collecting and analyzing data to address natural resource management issues on local public lands. Course will include discussion of relevant regulations and management issues. Course may focus on ephemeral wetland, grassland, chaparral or dune ecosystems depending on the needs of local resource managers. Field-intensive course. (Prereq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units) and ENVS 560: Watershed Systems (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 580: Environmental and Resource Economics

Course explores concepts of negative externalities as drivers of environmental problems and conflict in common pool resources. Students examine fundamental microeconomic principles including benefit-cost analysis, marginal net benefits, rational choice theory, inter-temporal distribution of net benefits, and institutional analysis framework via a case study approach.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 583: Environmental Impact Assessment

The theory and practice of environmental impact assessment and analysis. The process of preparing environmental documents (such as EAs, EISs, and EIRs) as mandated by state and federal statutes and regulations under NEPA and CEQA. Application of environmental assessment in urban, regional, and land use planning contexts. Processes of public participation and comment. Litigation and environmental mediation.  (Coreq: ENVS 583L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 583L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab

Field methods, sampling techniques, and visits to local projects that support environmental assessment. (Coreq: ENVS 583: Environmental Impact Assessment (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

ENVS 595L: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 0 — 6

ENVS 596: Field Studies

Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Environmental Science, Technology and Policy.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits. (Instructors Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENVS 599: Masters Thesis

Faculty-mentored, independent research leading toward completion of the MS thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits that count toward the degree. Requires approval of the thesis advisor.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 660: Adv Watershed Sci & Policy

Addresses current watershed environmental issues using advanced research methods and sound science. Students work in teams to complete applied research projects addressing real-world problems. Considers issues from multiple perspectives, including legal, political, diverse stakeholders, and natural science. Students present project results in both written and oral formats, utilizing innovative visualizations, as necessary, to communicate technical science to decision-makers or non-specialists.

Units: 4 — 4

Environmental studies

ENSTU 111: Introduction to Environmental Communication

This course provides students with foundations in effective oral communication and will aid in student's understanding and development in stating, organizing and researching ideas, and presenting them to an audience.   The seminar style format will allow students to speak openly and directly to both the instructor and each other during every class session throughout the semester. Through this process, students will strengthen the faculties of active and critical listening abilities and problem solve about topics in environmental and marine science, as well as deepen their understanding of their goals as they develop their intended pathway while at CSUMB. 

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 120: Writing about the Environment

This communication course is designed to develop and enhance critical reading, writing, and thinking.  Student abilities related to written communication are at the heart of this course as we critically read and explore multiple perspectives on environmental topics.  Students will write primarily expository and argumentative texts related to environmental topics that respond to a variety of rhetorical situations and contexts and incorporate college-level research.

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 130: Science, Media, & Society

This communication course examines the mediated intersection between science and society.  It offers students the tools to comprehend and analyze science messages found in a variety of communication contexts, including science news messages found in a variety of print, broadcast, and online communication channels from a variety of sources.  By examining how science is portrayed in public communication contexts regarding issues such as climate change, medical research, agricultural science, and engineering and technology, we will learn how to interpret and critically assess the science messages that surround us.  For each topic, we will examine a variety of messages and evaluate the credibility of claims and sources, inductive and deductive reasoning, and identify fallacies.  For each science message, we will reflect on the role of values, ideologies, and ethics involved in shaping our understanding of science and our world. (Recommend prior completion of GE Area A2)

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 280: Environmental Economics and Policy

This course covers the principles of government and economics, and applies these to policies, economics, and management of natural resources. Course materials emphasize fundamentals as well as current events in environmental economics and policy. The course covers principles in traditional micro and macro economics as well as ecological economics. The course informs students about the structure, process and dynamics of governmental systems, so they can be effective members of the active citizenry. Economic principles are applied at local, national, and international scales, to cover a broad suite of uses for ecological resources, and explore how decisions about these resources can lead to conservation or to over-exploitation. Economic and policy principles are applied to demonstrate how economic decisions can be managed within the existing regulatory framework, to implement socially preferred levels of resource use.  (Recommend completion of GE Areas B4 and A2 and A3 prior to enrolling) 

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies

Students develop critical thinking skills in conjunction with library research, reading, listening, and speaking skills needed to understand and analyze complex social and environmental controversies and promote societal awareness, engagement, and sound decision making. [(Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: ENSTU 280: Environmental Economics and Policy (3 units) or ENVS 284: Envi Econ & Management (2 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENSTU 309: Science and Policy of Global Climate Change

Examines the scientific and political dimensions of global climate change. Course is grounded in the science of climate change including the role of uncertainty, evidence and peer review relative to other ways of knowing about climate change. Focuses on effects of climate change on human health and food supply. Examines local, national and global implementation of policies to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases and solutions that increase human health and well-being.  (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 349S: Environmental Interpretation and Outreach

Focuses on techniques for communicating environmental messages to diverse audiences based primarily on the field of environmental interpretation. Students develop environmental messaging strategies and/or interpretive products for local organizations. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE AREA B2)]

Units: 5 — 5

ENSTU 350: Research Methods for Environmental Studies

Overview of qualitative and quantitative research methods that environmental professionals use in understanding complex problems, drafting research proposals, and analyzing and presenting rigorous, reliable information. Students will engage in comprehensive explorations of social aspects of environmental topics and will understand the central role that information and research play in enacting appropriate change in natural and built environments with diverse populations. [(Prereq: ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science (4 units) and BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) and (STAT 100: Introduction to Statistics (3 units) or STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units)) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENSTU 365: Critical Pedagogy for Environmental Education

Explores strategies for supporting equitable educational opportunities and access to natural environments for all. Through an examination of both the means (formal, informal education, place-based learning, and participatory practice) and the locations (schools, after-school programs, parks, and public spaces), this course examines approaches to education, enabling policies and frameworks for participation, and methodologies that can facilitate learning among diverse students and community members. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 with a C- or better) and (GE Area B2)]

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 369S: Com-Based Watershed Restor SL

This course addresses the meta question: "How can community-based environmental restoration address issues of social and environmental justice?" The course examines: waves of culture affecting Monterey County's significant social issues, personal action and responsibility through watershed based community partnerships modeling of environmental and sustainability practices. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area B1 or B2)]

Units: 5 — 5

ENSTU 375: Sustainability Systems

Explores common structural characteristics and archetypes associated with natural and anthropogenic systems and how such characteristics can be applied to understanding and decision making. Concepts applied include feedback, stocks and flows, delays, and causal loops. Uses the Stella programming environment for modelling. Applies projective geometric constructions as a manifestation of some of the systems concepts described. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better) and (GE Areas B1 and B2 and B3)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENSTU 376: Infrastructure Systems: Past, Present and Future

Course provides a basic overview of the history and present state of each of our utilities and of our building, transportation and agricultural infrastructure. Practical and ideal future scenarios as well as the integrative relationships between and among different utility systems are examined. Students will learn how our current infrastructure came about and what it would take to make improvements to it in a tractable manner. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better) and (GE Areas B1 and B2 and B3 with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENSTU 384: Social & Ecological Justice

Engages in philosophical works on social justice theory, ecological justice theory, and responsibility theory; uses an integrated social and ecological justice framework for analyzing social and environmental problems and for developing, analyzing, and promoting sustainable and equitable practices and policies. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A2 and A3 with a C- or better) and (Coreq: ENVS 384S)]

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 384S: Social and Ecological Justice Service Learning

Uses an integrated social and ecological justice framework for developing an understanding of self and social awareness; service and social responsibility; community and social justice; multicultural community building; and civic engagement; deepens and critically applies learning through placements and activities with local community organizations. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 with a C- or better) and (Coreq: ENSTU 384: Social & Ecological Justice (3 units))]

Units: 2 — 2

ENSTU 387: Water Resource Assess/Law/Poli

Evaluates development of water use/management throughout history. Critiques how geography, economics, culture, and politics guide people's decision-making and use and management of water. Analyzes and compares U.S. and California constitutions based on historic, geographic, political, economic, and cultural context and influences relating to water regulation. Students participate in historically informed political project applying political participation in the local community. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 394: Environmental Studies Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires critical thinking and specialized environmental knowledge and skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Prereq: Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENSTU 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

ENSTU 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select independent project. (Instructor consent required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENSTU 410: Capstone Integration Seminar

Assists students enrolled in a group capstone project course in preparing their final written report, poster, and/or oral presentation for their senior capstone process. Students will also complete their ENSTU e-portfolio. Students must co-enroll in ENSTU 471: Projects for Sustainable City Year (4 units), 472, or 494 or another approved capstone project course. [(Prereq: (ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) with a C- or better ) and (Coreq: ENSTU 471: Projects for Sustainable City Year (4 units) or ENSTU 472: Projects in Environmental Education (4 units) or ENSTU 494: Environmental Studies Capstone Internship (1-2 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

ENSTU 412: Enviro Thought & Practice

In-depth exploration of environmental thought and culture including human values and relationships to the natural world from historical, cultural, and contemporary perspectives, with an emphasis on understanding and influencing environments at local and global scales. Students interpret themes from recent academic research and professional practice, including environmental history, sociology, planning studies, and environmental education. Students conduct an in-depth analysis of one approach. (Prereq: ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) or ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or BIO 300 or MSCI 300 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

ENSTU 471: Projects for Sustainable City Year

Project-based class based on the needs of a regional city. Part of the Sustainable City Year Program. Projects will focus on regional sustainability issues and will vary from semester to semester. [(Prereq: (ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) or BIO 300 or ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or MSCI 300) and (ENSTU 375: Sustainability Systems (4 units) or ENSTU 376: Infrastructure Systems: Past, Present and Future (4 units)) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: ENSTU 350: Research Methods for Environmental Studies (4 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENSTU 472: Projects in Environmental Education

Project based class with a regional environmental education partner. Projects will place students in learning environments where students will focus on sustainability and environmental topics. Projects will vary from year to year. [(Prereq: ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) or ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or BIO 300 or MSCI 300 with a C- or better) and (Coreq: ENSTU 410: Capstone Integration Seminar (1 units)) and (Prereq or Coreq: ENSTU 350: Research Methods for Environmental Studies (4 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENSTU 494: Environmental Studies Capstone Internship

Students work in a volunteer or paid internship that requires advanced environmental studies  knowledge and skills, Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Prereq: Senior Standing) (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

ENSTU 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENSTU 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and independent project.  (Instructor consent required)

Units: 1 — 2

Geology

GEOL 210: Introduction to Earth Science

Focuses on earth science content and scientific investigation and experimentation abilities required for the multiple-subject teaching credential. Topics include Earth's atmosphere and water, structure and composition of the solid Earth, processes that change the Earth (with emphasis on plate tectonics and California geology), Earth's resources, and Earth's place in the solar system and universe.

Units: 3 — 3

GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology

Lecture and field-based course introducing geology and hydrology in the context of natural hazards and natural resources. Includes plate tectonics, mineral and rock ID, rock structure, geologic time, landslides, earthquakes, flooding, soil, rivers, and water resources. Students gain topographic survey experience. Field-intensive course. [Prereq: (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) and (CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units) or CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units) or PHYS 121: Integrated Physical Science (3 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

GEOL 310: Natural Disasters and Human Impacts

Introduces geologic catastrophes, such as earthquake, volcanic eruption, landslide, tsunami, severe weather, flood, and wildfire, with emphasis on the relationship between humans and natural hazards. Examine physical processes that cause these natural Earth events. Discussion of historical events and societal impacts. Students will assess risk and evaluate mitigation alternatives. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and  A3 and B4 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

GEOL 360: Geomorphic Systems

This is a lecture and field-based course introducing landscape monitoring and analysis. Topics include theories of landscape equilibrium and evolution, weathering, erosion, hillslope processes, river processes, landslides, active tectonics, coastal processes, and coastal response to climate change. These theories are applied to natural hazard topics and restoration of disturbed lands. May include one or more weekend field trips. Field-intensive course. Prior experience with spreadsheets and GIS is recommended. [(Prereq: GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

GEOL 460: River Hydrology, Assmt&Monitor

Lecture and field-based course introducing advanced topics in watershed processes. Students apply the theories of hydrology, flood frequency, hydraulics, and sediment transport to topics in watershed and river management. Students gain experience in hydrologic and geomorphic monitoring techniques. May include one or more weekend field trips. Field-intensive course. (Prereq: GEOL 360: Geomorphic Systems (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

Marine science

MSCI 185: Adventures in Marine Science

There is no better place to study marine science than here in the southern Monterey Bay. This course will describe the many ways marine scientists (including each of the CSUMB Marine Science faculty) study the marine environment from sandy beaches to kelp forests to the deep sea. Lectures will describe the career alternatives for an MSCI graduate and detail how courses at CSUMB will prepare students for those careers. Activities will expose students to the ecosystems of the Monterey Bay and the approaches used to study those ecosystems.

Units: 1 — 1

MSCI 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Marine Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

MSCI 270: Introduction to Oceanography

Introduction to the major physical, chemical, biological, and geological features and processes of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere. Special emphasis is placed on developing an integrated understanding of physical and biological processes and the interactions of people with the marine environment. [Prereq: (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) and (CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units) or CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 3 — 3

MSCI 295: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Marine Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

MSCI 305: Marine Life of Monterey Bay

There is no better place to study marine science than here in the southern Monterey Bay. This course will 1) explore the many creatures that make the Bay a global destination (including white sharks, whales, otters and many others), 2) survey the different approaches used by scientists to study them (including SCUBA, remotely operated vehicles, E-DNA), 3) review the major threats to creatures in the Bay and beyond (including climate change, commercial fishing, marine debris), and 4) discuss the major management paradigms in place to manage the marine environment (including marine protected areas as well as federal and state statutes). (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and B4 with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

MSCI 310: Small Boat Field Techniques

Students use CSUMB's small trailerable research vessels as platforms for off-shore environmental sampling, ROV operations, scuba diving, and other boat-based marine and fresh water research techniques. Prior CA boating safety course (valid CA boater card) required. A course fee may be required. [Prereq: (MSCI 270: Introduction to Oceanography (3 units)) and (PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists (4 units) or PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 1 — 1

MSCI 331: Ecological Physiology

An in-depth examination of the major physiological adaptations of marine organisms, including thermoregulation, respiration, circulation, water balance, acid-base balance, metabolism and energetics. Emphasis will be placed on how organisms are adapted to optimize physiological function under a variety of environmental conditions. We will also focus on the effects of environmental change on marine organismal physiology in the context of climate change (global warming, acidification, hypoxia). [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and (PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists (4 units) or PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units) or PHYS 221: Physics II (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 337: Robotics for Ecological Research

Through a series of hands-on project modules, students develop practical skills in electronics, microcontroller programming, and robotics sufficient to design and build simple, programmable robots, sensor/datalogger systems, or other electronic devices for collecting environmental measurements in terrestrial, freshwater, or marine ecosystems. Course fee may be required. [Prereq: (MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) and (PHYS 121: Integrated Physical Science (3 units) or PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists (4 units) or PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units) or CST 231: Problm-Solving/Programng (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 340: Marine Ecology

This course will provide an overview of key concepts in marine ecology and familiarize students with local marine ecosystems (rocky shores, kelp beds, estuarine wetlands, and mud flats). (Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 5 — 5

MSCI 341: Conservation Genetics

This course will examine mechanisms and models of population genetics and evolutionary biology. The course will focus on how these methods get used and applied to conservation and management of marine resources. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and (MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology

Examines the biodiversity, classification, and functional morphology of living marine organisms with an emphasis on Monterey Bay species, habitats, issues, and research. An introductory oceanography course is recommended, but not required, prior to taking this course. [(Prereq: MSCI 270: Introduction to Oceanography (3 units) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: (PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists (4 units) or PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units) or PHYS 221: Physics II (4 units) with a C- or better))]

Units: 3 — 3

MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science

The course provides an introduction to the design and analysis of studies conducted in marine systems. Students will acquire training in the use of multiple statistical techniques and appropriate statistical packages that can be used to analyze data from the marine environment. [Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) or BIO 345 or BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) or MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 359S: Marine Science Service Learning

Marine Science in the Community, a service learning course, introduces students to human and community social justice (and injustice) issues related to local and global ocean interfaces. Thirty hours of direct service with organizations involved in protecting marine environments will be the basis for class discussions on how class, ethnicity, language, economic and educational status relate to ocean health. Besides service, this class requires journaling, readings, and panel discussion. (Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 3 — 3

MSCI 370: Biological-Physical Oceanography

Advanced biological and physical oceanographic topics from phytoplankton to fisheries across estuaries and the open ocean. Students will learn principles of biological and physical oceanography, with an emphasis on physical processes and their ecological implications. [(Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and MSCI 270: Introduction to Oceanography (3 units)) and (PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists (4 units) or PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units)) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 380: Scientific Diving Techniques

This course will provide an introduction to the techniques for conducting scientific research underwater using SCUBA, including transects, quadrats, behavioral observations, videography and photography, and many others. In addition to lectures and pool training sessions, there will be a significant number of open water dives. The course will provide the 100 hours of required training for scientific divers as prescribed by the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS). [Prereq: (KIN 282: Advanced SCUBA Rescue (1 units) and KIN 282L: Advanced SCUBA Rescue Lab (1 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq or Prereq: KIN 283: Master Diver Certification (1 units) and KIN 283L: Master Diver Certification Lab (1 units) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 394: Marine Science Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires critical thinking and specialized marine science or technical skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Prereq: Junior OR Senior Standing) (Instructor Consent Required) 

Units: 1 — 2

MSCI 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Marine Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

MSCI 410: Marine Science Group Capstone

Assists students enrolled in a capstone project course in preparing their final written report, poster, and/or oral presentation for their Senior Capstone Project. Students must enroll concurrently in an approved Capstone Project Course. [(Prereq: MSCI 300 or MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) with a C- or better) and (Coreq: MSCI 430: Marine Experimental Physiology (4 units) or MSCI 437: Ocean Instrumentation Projects (4 units) or MSCI 445: Projects in Marine Ecology (4 units) or MSCI 455: Marine Fish Ecology (4 units) or MSCI 470: Science Policy and Management in the Marine Environment (4 units) or MSCI 475: Marine Conservation Biology (4 units) or MSCI 480: Kelp Forest Ecology (4 units) or MSCI 485: Marine Biogeography of California (4 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

MSCI 430: Marine Experimental Physiology

This course uses a group project approach to address a real-world marine environmental physiology problem. This course will increase knowledge retention and integration of concepts in marine science, physiology and biology, and teach students what it is like to work in a research laboratory setting. Includes group capstone project option. [Prereq: (STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (MSCI 331: Ecological Physiology (4 units) or BIO 330: Vertebrate Physiology (3 units)) with a C- or better) and GWAR]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 437: Ocean Instrumentation Projects

This is a project-based course requiring previous experience with electronics and microcontroller programming. Students work in groups to evaluate and improve the performance of subsea sensors, ROVs, or other instrumentation used to collect data for applied marine science research. Grading is based primarily on written reports. Course project may be used as a course-based capstone project. [Prereq: (MSCI 337: Robotics for Ecological Research (4 units) with a C- or better) or (Instructor Consent)]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 445: Projects in Marine Ecology

Marine Ecology 445 is a lecture and field-based exploration of marine ecological concepts and theory using the diverse ecosystems of Monterey Bay as a living laboratory. Students witness and learn how organisms interact with one another and their environments, and see how these factors govern the distribution and abundance of species within marine systems. This group project-based course can fulfill the Marine Science major capstone requirement with co-enrollment in MSCI 410: Marine Science Group Capstone (1 units). [(Prereq: MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) and MSCI 370: Biological-Physical Oceanography (4 units) and (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) or BIO 345) and (MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science (4 units) or ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units)) with C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 455: Marine Fish Ecology

Course explores the ecology of marine fishes and associated conservation and management efforts. Focuses upon fish distribution and the environmental drivers underlying that distribution in California and other locales. Students complete a semester-long project involving field sampling along the central coast using a suite of tools, including remotely operated vehicles, towed camera sleds, and SCUBA. Course project may be used as a course-based capstone project.  [(Prereq: (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) AND MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) with a C- or better) and (Prereq or Coreq: (MSCI 370: Biological-Physical Oceanography (4 units) and (MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science (4 units) or ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units)) with a C- or better)]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 470: Science Policy and Management in the Marine Environment

This course draws from multiple disciplines to address first hand issues of science and science policy management integration in the marine environment. [(Prereq: (MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) or BIO 340: Ecology (4 units)) and MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) with a C- or better and GWAR)]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 474: Marine Landscape Ecology

Course covers the theory and application of landscape ecology to studies of the marine environment. Students will be introduced to the use of mapping and statistical tools that can be used in studies focused on understanding how marine landscapes drive patterns of species distribution and abundance. [Prereq: ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units) and MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) and (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) or BIO 345) and (MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 475: Marine Conservation Biology

This course covers the science and issues surrounding the loss of marine species and habitats resulting from overexploitation, habitat loss, species introductions, climate change, and other threats. Students will examine the science behind management decisions, especially place-based management, and will develop a group capstone project addressing marine conservation within the Monterey Bay area. [Prereq: MSCI 300 and (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) or BIO 345) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 477: Global Change Biology

This course examines how the biosphere (plants, animals and ecosystems) is responding to unprecedented rates of anthropogenic climate change. Lectures cover physical drivers and biological consequences of climate change in Earths' biomes from pole to pole, marine, aquatic and terrestrial. Emphasis is placed on reading and synthesizing scientific journal articles and interpretation of climate change data. [Prereq: (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) and MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units)) and (MSCI 370: Biological-Physical Oceanography (4 units) or MSCI 331: Ecological Physiology (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 3 — 3

MSCI 480: Kelp Forest Ecology

Focuses on local kelp forest ecosystems of Monterey Bay through lectures that are supplemented with SCUBA dives at local dive sites. Fieldwork will allow the class to qualitatively and quantitatively examine local kelp forest ecology through a group capstone project or individually directed research projects. [Prereq: (MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) and MSCI 380: Scientific Diving Techniques (4 units)) and (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 485: Marine Biogeography of California

SCUBA-based group capstone course involves the collection and analysis of data on fishes and invertebrates from across CA. Focuses on biogeographical patterns of the subtidal zone. This course requires field trips on weekends and dates when classes are not normally in session. Dive sites may be located inside many of CA's marine protected areas. A final project combines data collected by each student into a single, comprehensive analysis. Course fee may be required. [Prereq: (MSCI 300 or MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units)) and (MSCI 380: Scientific Diving Techniques (4 units)) and (MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) or BIO 345) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 490: Marine Science Honors Capstone

Student works with advisor(s) to complete a Marine Science Honors Capstone project, including a written product and some form of presentation (including an oral presentation and/or a poster presentation). The precise structure of the course will vary among advisors. Students must have an approved research project prior to enrolling in this course. [(Prereq: MSCI 340: Marine Ecology (5 units) and MSCI 345: Marine Biodiversity and Functional Morphology (3 units) and MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science (4 units) and ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units) with a C- or better) and (Instructor Consent Required)]

Units: 1 — 1

MSCI 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Marine Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

MSCI 497: Independent Research

Student and faculty member select independent research project. Instructor permission required.  (Prereq: Senior Standing)

Units: 1 — 2

MSCI 530: Marine Experimental Physiology

This course uses a group project approach to address a real-world marine environmental physiology problem. This course will increase knowledge retention and integration of concepts in marine science, physiology and biology, and teach students what it is like to work in a research laboratory setting.

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 545: Marine Ecological Systems

Examines the fundamentals of marine ecology, emphasizing experimental design and use of technologies that are appropriately scaled to answer management questions. Lectures emphasize the processes contributing to the structure and organization of marine communities, the role of humans as a major source of disturbance, and the efficacy of current management paradigms. Laboratories emphasize current technologies and analytical approaches used in the study of sub-tidal marine communities.

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 555: Marine Fish Ecology

Explores the ecology of marine fishes and associated conservation and management. Focuses upon fish distribution and the environmental drivers underlying that distribution in California and other locales. Students will complete a semester-long project involving field sampling along the central coast using a suite of tools, including remotely operated vehicles, towed camera sleds, and SCUBA. Students must have completed coursework in marine biology and ecology. (Cross-listed with MSCI 455: Marine Fish Ecology (4 units)).

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 574: Marine Landscape Ecology

Course covers the theory and application of landscape ecology to studies of the marine environment. Students will be introduced to the use of mapping and statistical tools that can be used in studies focused on understanding how marine landscapes drive patterns of species distribution and abundance.

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 575: Marine Conservation Biology

This course covers the science and issues surrounding the loss of marine species and habitats resulting from overexploitation, habitat loss, species introductions, climate change, and other threats. Students will examine the science behind management decisions, especially place-based management, and will develop a group capstone project addressing marine conservation within the Monterey Bay area.

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 585: Marine Biogeography of California

Collection and analysis of data on fishes and invertebrates from across CA. Focuses on biogeographical patterns of the subtidal zone. This course requires field trips on weekends and dates when classes are not normally in session. Dive sites may be located inside many of CA's marine protected areas. A final project combines data collected by each student into a single, comprehensive analysis. Course fee may be required.

Units: 4 — 4

MSCI 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Marine Science. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

MSCI 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits. (Instructor Consent Required)

Units: 1 — 2

MSCI 645: Advanced Marine Science and Policy

Draws on the tenets of marine conservation biology, and related disciplines, to prepare scientists for engagement in policy formulation and management at a variety of levels. Provides a detailed assessment of the field of marine conservation biology, link ecological processes to threats and solutions, and define the human and legal dimensions of marine conservation. Explores specific conservation scenarios with case studies from the Monterey Bay region and beyond.

Units: 4 — 4

Physics

PHYS 121: Integrated Physical Science

Introduces the basic principles of physical science and the application of these principles in modern society. Topics include: nature, properties, and reactions of matter; objects at rest and in motion, energy and power, fluids, heat, light, sound, and electricity. For non-science majors. (Coreq: PHYS 121L: Integrated Phy Science Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists

Introduces the fundamental concepts of classical physics, especially for students interested in the life sciences. Covers motion, forces, waves, energy, thermodynamics, gravity, fluids, electricity, magnetism, light, and optics using examples drawn from biological, environmental, and health science disciplines. (Formerly known as Survey of Physics) [Prereq: MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) and (CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (3 units) or FYS 121 or CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units)) with a C- or better]

Units: 4 — 4

PHYS 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in PHYS. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

PHYS 220: Physics I

Emphasizes motion, mechanics, energy, and fluids using active and experiential learning. (Prereq: CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units) and MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

PHYS 221: Physics II

Covers topics in electricity, magnetism, and optics. Emphasizes active and experiential learning and practical applications. (Prereq: MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units) and PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units) with a C- or better)

Units: 4 — 4

PHYS 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Physics. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

PHYS 530: Electronics for Grad Research

Provides a practical foundation in basic electronic circuit design, construction, and repair to assist science graduate students who may need to select, use, repair, or invent electronic equipment to complete their graduate thesis project.

Units: 4 — 4