Marine Landscape Ecology Lab

Department of Marine Science

Development of Scale Dependent Survey Methods for Monitoring Species Diversity and Abundance in Coastal Marine Communities

General landscape ecology theory suggests the factors that affect species distribution and abundance at the scale of a few meters may not necessarily relate to species distribution and abundance at larger spatial scales. Our lab is currently developing survey methods that can be used to estimate scale dependency in the relationship between environmental factors and patterns of species distribution and abundance in rocky intertidal communities. The data collected by members of our lab will then be used to develop GIS and statistical models that will provide estimates as to how strongly physical and biological processes structure intertidal marine communities at regional and local scales. The development of such models can then be used to help guide the design of environmental monitoring surveys aimed at tracking the relationship between the environment and marine species at multiple spatial scales. This work is currently being conducted at Point Lobos State Reserve and is funded by the Foundation of CSU Monterey Bay.

Geospatial field sampling with Total Station laser surveyor at Point Lobos State Marine Reserve.
Geospatial field sampling with Total Station laser surveyor at Point Lobos State Marine Reserve.