Kinesiology courses

KIN 102: Monterey Bay Adventure Sports

This course will focus on the many outdoor recreational opportunities surrounding CSUMB and the Monterey Peninsula. Students will have an opportunity to participate in hiking, trail running, mountain biking, kayaking, surfing and canyoneering, with an emphasis on safety and training. Requires off-campus trips, equipment rental fees and a final exam.

Units: 2 — 2

KIN 109: Swimming: Beginning

Teaches the very basic techniques, skills, and concepts of swimming to those with little or limited swimming experience. Develop a sense of confidence in swimming through 12 steps to practice and the common combination of drills. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 110: Strength Training

Students learn about and engage in resistance training as a means of improving and maintaining muscular fitness. Includes basic instruction in exercise technique, spotting, safety and basic resistance training program design.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 111: Swimming for Fitness

Students engage in swimming and learn about the use of swimming as a means of improving aerobic fitness. Also targets improvements in stroke efficiency. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 113: Wake-Up Workouts

Students learn about, develop, and execute a personal fitness program; emphasizing improvements in muscular and aerobic fitness through a wide variety of activities. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 114: Walking

Students learn about and engage in fitness walking as a means of improving health and well-being. A variety of walking venues are used along with special small or large group activities. Credit/ no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 116: Adaptive Sports: Aquatics

Instructs on adapting Physical Activity for each individual's unique needs through the use of the pool to enhance one's overall health and well-being. Course content decided upon between instructor and student. Designed especially for individuals with permanent or temporary disability. Credit/no credit. (Offered as needed)

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 117: Adapted Sports: Dry Land

A learning experience for individuals who would like to select a physical activity program with adaptations to meet their individual needs. Course content decided upon between instructor and student, resulting in many program options and variety. This experience, in conjunction with adapted aquatics can provide daily activity for individuals who are temporarily or permanently in need of adapted physical activity. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 118: Water Aerobics

Using flotation devices, students follow the instructor through a wide variety of movements using the water as resistance with the goal of improving muscular and aerobic fitness. No experience in swimming necessary. Credit/ no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 119: Aquatics Activities

Provides instruction in water activity that ranges from underwater hockey to water polo. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 120: CPR/First Aid

Covers instruction and practice in the immediate and temporary care of injuries and sudden illness. Includes emergency response, rescue breathing, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and first aid for adults only. Conforms to American Red Cross standards. Optional written and practical certification exam offered at end of course.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 123: Step Aerobics

An introduction to step aerobic exercise. Additional cardiovascular training methods such as dance may also be included. The course also will teach students to monitor their progress throughout the semester. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 131: Beginning Tai Chi Chi Kung

Short Sun Style form of qigong exercises to improve mobility and flexibility and develop better balance. The second form emphasizes power, a simple Yang style Tai Chi/Chi Kung form that teaches the principles of body mechanics through the alignment of the bone structure with the force of gravity. Explains theory and provides training for effective practice of any form of Tai Chi. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 132: Beginning Chen Taijiquan

Consists of step-by-step progression to a Chen 26 Movement Form. Fundamentals include standing meditation, proper body posture, footwork drills, along with self-defense applications. Training in body mechanics, including whole-body exercises which increase mobility, promote relaxation, and reduce physical tension and strain. Credit/No Credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 134: Self-Defense

A hands-on class that incorporates the four components of self-defense: awareness, avoidance, and verbal and physical techniques. Teaches verbal and physical self-defense skills from a standing position and from the ground. This class focuses on rape-prevention and aims to reduce fear and empower students with skills to defend themselves against physical, verbal and sexual attacks. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 139: Yoga

Introduces the physical practice of yoga and explores the emotional and philosophical aspects of this ancient discipline. Practice of postures build from basic poses to more challenging poses. Builds strength, endurance and flexibility through practice. Also includes the study of yoga through assigned readings, class discussions and journaling. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 140: Yoga II

Designed for students who have completed KIN 139: Yoga (1 units) and wish to continue their study of Yoga. Welcomes beginners with no prior yoga experience as well. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 141: Disc Golf

Students learn the skills, beginner through advanced, needed to master the game of disc golf. Credit/No Credit

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 143: Volleyball

Introduces students to indoor court volleyball. Students develop passing, blocking, and hitting skills. Students learn the rules, scoring, and team strategies and tactics. Credit/No Credit

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 144: Basketball

Facilitates the development of fundamental skill in basketball. While skill enhancement is the desired outcome, also covers the rules and regulations of the game, and the history and growth of basketball. Credit/ no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 145: Softball

Students develop throwing, catching, fielding, hitting, and base-running skills while learning rules, scoring, and team strategies for offensive and defensive fast-pitch and slow-pitch softball. Credit/ No Credit

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 148: Running

Students learn and practice the training methods and techniques needed to develop cardiovascular fitness. Students develop a personal running training program. Credit/No Credit

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 149: Surfing

Covers surfing for beginners and first timers. Opportunities for advanced surfers to act as aids to the head instructor. Covers etiquette, right of way rules, equipment, and safety. Must be able to pass a swimming safety test. Includes extensive in-the-water experience. Requires some equipment. Surf boards will be supplied. Course fee required. Credit/ no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 151: Sailing I

Apply theory to practice in small centerboard type sailboats. Includes maneuvering and driving a boat, rules of the road, nomenclature, knots, developing teamwork, and practicing water and boat safety. Includes extensive on-the-water experience. Must have the ability to swim. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 152: Sailing II

Apply theory to practice in keelboats. Covers rules of the road, sailing language, knots, and water safety. Sailing skills include reefing, heaving-to, crew-overboard recovery, and changing sail while underway. Covers skills such as anchoring, docking, and tide and weather consideration. An American Sailing Association (ASA) certification course, includes lecture and extensive on-the-water experience. Must have the ability to swim. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 161: Health and Well Being

This course will cover health and well being topics focusing on the health effects of stress, stress management skills, applied nutrition and core concepts in exercise and weight management. In addition to these core topics, the course will address the six dimensions of wellness: physical, emotional, intellectual, social, environmental and spiritual.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 162: Fdn of Wellness: Nutrition

Addresses core concepts of health and wellness, the interrelationship and benefits of physical fitness, proper nutrition, and effective stress management in theory and practice. Emphasizes nutritional understanding and actual eating decisions. Includes self-assessments, development and implementation of personal wellness goals/plans/actions, and self-reflection on consequences of lifestyle choices.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 180: Backpacking & Hiking

Provides students with the knowledge and skills to safely backpack and hike in a variety of conditions. Focuses on equipment, menu planning, navigation and leave-no-trace camping. (Coreq: KIN 180L: Backpacking & Hiking Lab (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 180L: Backpacking & Hiking Lab

Required lab course for KIN 180: Backpacking & Hiking (1 units). Includes a three-day backpacking trip over a weekend and several day hikes on Fort Ord recreation lands. Requires course fee. Credit/ no credit. (Coreq: KIN 180: Backpacking & Hiking (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Kinesiology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

KIN 238: Introduction to Qigong

The study of Channeling Energy and Self-Empowerment. Teaches eastern theory and practice for cultivating energy or "Chi". Course addresses Qigong meditation practices. Credit/No Credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 254L: Kayaking Lab

Required lab course for KIN 254: Kayaking (1 units). Requires field trips and course fee. Credit/no credit. (Coreq: KIN 254: Kayaking (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 254: Kayaking

Introduces skills for intermediate level sea kayaking. Covers equipment, paddling techniques, navigation, weather, surf zone dynamics and rescues. Earn a certificate from the American Canoe Association upon completion. Credit/No Credit (Coreq: KIN 254L: Kayaking Lab (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 263: Introduction to Human Sexuality

Addresses the core concepts of human sexuality and the interrelationship that exists between it and mental, physical, social, emotional and spiritual well-being. Assists students in understanding the nature of their own sexuality, the importance of sexuality in their lives and the responsibility and pleasure it brings to individuals and their partners. Emphasis will be placed on the variations of expressions by culture, age, and orientation and their relationship with well-being.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 271S: Fdn of Well: Comm Participate

Provides an overview of factors that contribute to health and wellness while engaging in self-reflective, culturally aware and responsive community participation with community organizations.

Units: 5 — 5

KIN 280: SCUBA Diving

Entry-level scuba certification intended for the student with little or no scuba experience. The aquatic content covers practical SCUBA skills and techniques. Students who complete all academic, pool, and open water requirements may be eligible for SCUBA Diver certification through National Association of Underwater Instructors [NAUI]. One or two weekend fieldtrips may be required. Prior to participating in open-water activities, an appropriate medical release to dive must be on file. (Offered every semester). (Coreq: KIN 280L: SCUBA Diving Lab (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 280L: SCUBA Diving Lab

Required lab course for KIN 280: SCUBA Diving (1 units). Students must have ability to swim. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit. (Offered every semester). (Coreq: KIN 280: SCUBA Diving (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 281: Rock Climbing

Focuses on top-roped rock climbing and bouldering. Covers equipment, techniques, and training. Includes knots, anchor systems, belaying, rappelling, and risk assessment. Held outdoors and requires one weekend trip. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit.

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 282L: Advanced SCUBA Rescue Lab

Required lab course for KIN 282: Advanced SCUBA Rescue (1 units). Students must have the ability to swim. Credit/no credit. (Offered every semester). (Coreq: KIN 282: Advanced SCUBA Rescue (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 282: Advanced SCUBA Rescue

Certification course to increase understanding of diving. Includes classroom discussions, and participation and application of knowledge in open water. Covers applied sciences, environment, navigation, visibility, search and recovery, light salvage, deep simulated decompression and more. Requires a minimum of 8 field dives. Projects may be assigned outside of classroom time. Students who complete all of the course requirements are eligible for the NAUI Master SCUBA Diver certification. [(Prereq: KIN 280: SCUBA Diving (1 units) and KIN 280L: SCUBA Diving Lab (1 units)) or Instructor Consent and (Coreq: KIN 282L: Advanced SCUBA Rescue Lab (1 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 283L: Master Diver Certification Lab

The course is the practical application of the NAUI Master Scuba Dive Course. Field trips are required to complete a minimum of 8 scuba dives. Diving activities include deep diving night diving, advanced navigation, simulated stage decompression, small boat diving, light salvage, and search and recovery. Independent projects may be assigned outside of classroom time. Students who complete all the course requirements are eligible for the NAUI Master Scuba Diver certification. (Coreq: KIN 283: Master Diver Certification (1 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 283: Master Diver Certification

The NAUI Master Diver course is a continuing education certification course for divers who wish to increase their understanding and enjoyment of diving. Emphasis is on student participation and practical application of knowledge in open water, after classroom discussion of subjects. Topics covered include: Applied sciences, Diving equipment, Diving Risks, Diving Environment, Underwater Navigation, Limited Visibility Diving, Search and Recovery, Light Salvage and Deep and Simulated Decompression Diving. [(Prereq: KIN 282: Advanced SCUBA Rescue (1 units) and KIN 282L: Advanced SCUBA Rescue Lab (1 units)) or Instructor Consent and (Coreq: KIN 283L: Master Diver Certification Lab (1 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 300: Major Pro-Seminar

Introduces the history, debates, and definitions regarding the interdisciplinary degree in Kinesiology. Explores research skills needed to complete Senior Capstone project. Develops a learning plan that integrates a KIN concentration, Capstone interests, and personal and professional goals..

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 301: Research Methodologies

This course is an introduction to the design and interpretation of research. The course will familiarize students with testing, evaluation, and measurement techniques required of all Kinesiology disciplines. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the foundations and practice of quantitative and qualitative approaches.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 303: Fundamental Athletic Injury Management

An introductory course covering the basic concepts of administering management for common athletic injuries as they pertain to athletic participation at all levels. The class will cover topics such as necessary medical terminology, pertinent anatomy, bloodborne pathogens, emergency response plans, basic injury prevention, mechanisms, recognition and treatment, including some elementary taping techniques. Emphasis will be made on the role of the Certified Athletic Trainer.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 305: Technique in Strength & Conditioning

Students learn appropriate technique in strength and conditioning as it relates to basic performance, assessment, and program development. Focus includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 310: Athletic Strength & Condition

Presents practical application of physiological and biomechanical theory for development of and implementation of sports conditioning prescriptions. Helps athletes achieve optimal physical performance without incurring injury. Includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 320: Sports Nutrition

The course will use a current evidence based approach to relevant topics in Sports Nutrition. The student will become proficient in the anatomy and physiology of digestion, absorption and current nutritional guidelines. Additionally, the student will utilize current recommendations to evaluate and determine the appropriate nutritional strategies for a comprehensive array of recreational and competitive sports with the goal of improving performance and health.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 330: Physical Activity and Health

Provides students an integrated view of the relationship between physical activity or sedentarism and health outcomes; also, it provides a conceptual framework to help the students relate results from single studies or collections of studies to the overall paradigm linking physical activity and physical fitness to health. The class will focus on the prevention of diseases and the enhancement of quality of life and well-being.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 331: Lifespan Physical Activity

This course is a study of physical activity throughout the lifespan. Topics include current research, theory, and practice pertaining to physical activity in varying age groups, from childhood through older adulthood.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 335: Fundamentals of Coaching

Explores coaching from a literary and a personal perspective. Builds appreciation for the depth of the coaching profession through literature, studying different authors' views on topics that every coach in every sport must face. After establishing a solid base with literature, explores the topic in a hands-on environment through group discussions and projects. Provides an opportunity to explore the culture of coaching, highlighting several key points.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 340: Personal Training

Provides a theoretical overview of the scientific and practical knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to be a competent personal trainer. Includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association and the American College of Sports Medicine.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 345: Sports Ethics

Looks at issues in youth sport, intercollegiate sport, and professional sport. Discusses ethical questions, arguments, theories, and workable solutions for returning amateur sport to its proper place in society. Discusses the power of sport, the value of sport, and the place of sport in society.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 346: Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity

This course is devoted to understanding the psychological aspects of sport and physical activity. The course will include aspects of the core psychological research, application of psychological principles to sport and exercise settings, and social influences on psychological processes. Emphasis is placed on the comprehension and application of theoretical concepts addressing the interaction of individual characteristics and environmental factors in sport and physical activity.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 350: Worksite Health Promotion

Explores health promotion in the worksite including supporting theories and critical issues such as management support, economic benefits, and worksite health promotion professional standards; focus is on implementing worksite health promotion programs. Implementation phases include needs assessment/evaluation, effective interventions, program marketing and organizational development.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 355: Ethics in Physical Activity and Health

Explores ethical issues related to physical activity and allied health professions. Examines the practical application of principles and methods to evaluate ethical dilemmas in promotion of health. Topics include historical health-related & medical cases, development of current practices of informed consent, health policy and laws. The sub-fields of bioethics, sport ethics and contemporary issues in health will also be explored.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 360: Nutritional Science

Explores scientific concepts of nutrition related to nutrient chemistry, nutritional needs, practices, and problems throughout the life cycle. Examines where nutrition information is generated and how it is used in policy and populations. Emphasizes evidence-based, scientific nutritional information, education of individuals and groups toward health promotion and disease prevention. Finally, global nutrition issues are addressed with an emphasis on solutions. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 360L: Nutritional Science Lab

Focuses on application of scientific concepts of nutrition related to nutrient chemistry, nutritional needs, practices, and problems throughout the life cycle. Examines where nutrition information is generated and how it is used in policy and populations. Emphasizes evidence-based, scientific nutritional information, education of individuals and groups toward health promotion and disease prevention. Finally, global nutrition issues are addressed with an emphasis on solutions. [[Prereq: (KIN 360: Nutritional Science (3 units)) or (Coreq: KIN 360: Nutritional Science (3 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 362: Fundamentals of Nutrition

Includes team discussions, nutritional experiential labs combined with student-driven presentations. Presents scientific nutritional content, seriously looking at nutrition and activity patterns to improve eating choices and assist others. Examines special topics and nutritional needs in different ages, activity levels, and cultures. May offer a baseline medical lab screen at the beginning and end of the semester, free of charge. Must have completed vibrancy theory course. (Coreq: KIN 362L: Fundamentals of Nutrition Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 363: Human Sexuality

Addresses the physical, social, cultural, and emotional factors of human sexuality. Students will explore concepts and evidence so they can address their own sexuality, the decisions they make, the importance of sexuality in their lives, the responsibility it involves, and the compassion that is necessary for the well-being of all people. The lab, taken in conjunction with Human Sexuality, supports and expands the concepts from lecture and consists of fieldwork, short papers, and interviews. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 363L: Human Sexuality Lab

Addresses the physical, social, cultural, and emotional factors of human sexuality. Students will explore concepts and evidence so they can address their own sexuality, the decisions they make, the importance of sexuality in their lives, the responsibility it involves, and the compassion that is necessary for the well-being of all people. The lab, taken in conjunction with Human Sexuality, supports and expands the concepts from lecture and consists of fieldwork, short papers, and interviews. [(Prereq: KIN 363: Human Sexuality (3 units)) or (Coreq; KIN 363: Human Sexuality (3 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 365: Models & Dimension of Wellness

Explores a variety of useful models of the dimensions of Wellness, including a model of the contributing factors to high-level wellness. Offers the connection and usefulness of the models along with a variety of inventories and methods for using the models. In-depth coverage of several of the dimensions of wellness factors allows students to research particular areas of interest for personal or professional application.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 366: Health Behavior and Promotion

Students will learn, understand, and apply concepts in health promotion, health education and behavior change. Students will also learn, understand, apply, and analyze health promotion theories and models at the individual, interpersonal, and community levels. Students will gain an understanding of how and why health behavior change occurs.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 367: Consumer Advocacy

Provides students insight into media marketing campaigns within the broad field of Kinesiology; using an evidence-based approach, the course provides students knowledge, skills, and abilities to evaluate Kinesiology related claims.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 370L: Anatomy & Physiology I Lab

Detailed introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Concepts related to anatomical/physiological structures/functions of human body systems (chemistry, cells, tissues, axial and appendicular skeleton, muscular, nervous and endocrine) are covered. Additionally, principles of anatomy and physiology will be used to illustrate the scientific way of knowing. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (Coreq: KIN 370: Anatomy & Physiology I (3 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 370: Anatomy & Physiology I

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Concepts related to anatomical terminology, cells, tissues, integument, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems are covered. Interrelationships of organ systems and system pathologies are also emphasized. Additionally, principles of anatomy and physiology will be used to illustrate the scientific way of knowing. Finally, the process of peer-review and evidenced based evaluation of claims related to anatomy and physiology, health and pathology will also be incorporated. (First semester of two semester course). [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (Coreq: KIN 370L: Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (1 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 371: Anatomy & Physiology II

Introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Concepts related to circulatory-, lymphatic-, respiratory-, digestive-, urinary systems; immunity, metabolism, reproduction, development, genetics. An introduction to evolutionary medicine will be explored. Interrelationships of organ systems are emphasized. Anatomy and physiology principles will be used to illustrate the scientific way of knowing. Peer-review and evidenced based evaluation of claims related to anatomy and physiology, health and pathology will also be incorporated. (Second semester of two semester course). [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (Coreq: KIN 371L: Anatomy & Physiology II Lab (1 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 371L: Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

Detailed introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Concepts related to anatomical/physiological structures/functions of human body systems (immunity, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproduction, development and genetics) are covered. Additionally, principles of anatomy and physiology will be used to illustrate the scientific way of knowing. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (Coreq: KIN 371: Anatomy & Physiology II (3 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 372: Socio Persp Spor w/ Dis Emph

Provides an in-depth view of the essential issues regarding disability sport including: history, sport organizations including the Olympics, the international sport model, challenges and controversies, physical training, sport medicine issues, activity modifications, equipment uses and event management for both children and adults.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 373L: Health and Physical Education Lab

Supervised activity for KIN 373: Health and Physical Education (2 units).  Focuses on foundations of movement for children preschool to 8th grade from a growth and development perspective.  (Coreq: KIN 373: Health and Physical Education (2 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 373: Health and Physical Education

Focuses on foundations of movement for children preschool to 8th grade from a growth and development perspective. Emphasis is placed on health and physical activity and programmatic organization in the gymnasium and on the playground as it relates to problem solving and academic success; multicultural approaches to movement, moral development and self image; and movement exploration, body spatial awareness and other non-loco motor skills. (Coreq: KIN 373L: Health and Physical Education Lab (1 units))

Units: 2 — 2

KIN 375: Motor Behavior

Provides first experience with the body of knowledge known as motor behavior. Includes theories of motor control and motor learning, biological perspectives including the central nervous system, and motor neurons. Also offers learning perspectives related to motor learning and motor control including sensory systems, vision, memory, and multidimensional learning and social perspectives including practice and group dynamics.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 376: Prin of Mov for Ind w/ Disab

Includes programming in physical education for neurologically and physically impaired individuals in the psychomotor, affective, and cognitive domains. Provides a knowledge of disabilities, an understanding of indicators and contra-indicators related to skill development (including academics), and the ability to teach integrated movement activities to preschool to eighth grade children with disabilities.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 377: Neurological Impairment

An in-depth examination of the central nervous system in typical development and atypical development related to academic and motor success. Provides students with an understanding of the typical and atypical neurological bases underlying sensory motor development and performance, as well as the typical and atypical neurological mechanisms and processes for academic success. Includes addictions, phobias, and depression as disabilities.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 380: Sports Administration

Looks at administration as the framework and the machinery of the organization of sport. Covers guiding and managing human behavior; the fundamental functions of management; policies and procedures; strategic planning; and the business of sport including personnel issues, future directions, collegiate trademark licensing, communications, event management, media relations, and financial principles applied to sport.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 381: Legal Issues in Sport

Investigate event development, event participants, and event spectators in relation to the law and risk management. Topics of exploration include risk management principles; event directors and committees; what you can be liable for; waiver and medical releases; insurance; spectator concerns; alcohol; procedures for reducing the incidence of injuries; avoiding litigation through precautions, arbitration, and due care; and sports law.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 382: Wilderness Leadership

Focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of backcountry management. Readings on historical and modern examples of leadership are a core element. Includes leadership styles, group facilitation, risk management, and minimum impact camping techniques. (Coreq: KIN 382L: Wilderness Leadership Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 382L: Wilderness Leadership Lab

Required lab for KIN 382: Wilderness Leadership (3 units) and includes a weeklong intensive backpacking and mountaineering expedition. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit. (Coreq: KIN 382: Wilderness Leadership (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 383: Fdn of Adventure Education

Surveys the rise of experiential education programs and the theoretical models guiding these activities. Practices methods of teambuilding and personal development in hands-on situations. (Coreq: KIN 383L: Fdn of Adventure Education Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 383L: Fdn of Adventure Education Lab

Required lab course for KIN 383: Fdn of Adventure Education (3 units) and includes five days of field activities. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit. (Coreq: KIN 383: Fdn of Adventure Education (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 384: Wilderness Experience

Focuses on historical and modern concepts of wilderness. Examines adventure, exploration, and the development of modern environmental ethics. Surveys current uses and environmental issues in wilderness areas. Requires a weeklong intensive field expedition to the San Rafael Wilderness during Spring Break. (Coreq: KIN 384L: Wilderness Experience Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 384L: Wilderness Experience Lab

Required lab course for KIN 384: Wilderness Experience (3 units), including a weeklong intensive field expedition to the San Rafael Wilderness during Spring Break. Requires course fee. Credit/no credit. (Coreq: KIN 384: Wilderness Experience (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 385L: Outdoor Ed/Rec Prog Admin Lab

Required lab course for KIN 385: Outdoor Edu/Rec Program Admin (3 units) and includes an intensive field expedition to a wilderness area in California during Spring Break. Credit/no credit. (Coreq: KIN 385: Outdoor Edu/Rec Program Admin (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

KIN 385: Outdoor Edu/Rec Program Admin

Covers the design, logistics, and business aspects of outdoor education and recreation program administration in the nonprofit and commercial sectors. Practical exercises focus on budgets, logistics, risk management and course curriculum while preparing students for employment in the Outdoor Recreation Field. (Coreq: KIN 385L: Outdoor Ed/Rec Prog Admin Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 390: Exercise Physiology

Presents an overview of selected topics in exercise physiology with emphasis on practical applications in health, disease, and athletic performance. Provides students with a fundamental understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to acute and chronic exercise.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Kinesiology. Student(s) and faculty select topic and number of units. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 2 — 4

KIN 397: Independent Study

Studies a particular topic related to Kinesiology. Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 5

KIN 421L: Essential of Exercise Sci Lab

Provides the laboratory component of Exercise Physiology where students gain experience in the competencies and skills necessary for health and fitness assessment of diseased, normal, and athletic populations. Focus includes content necessary for nationally recognized certification exams administered by organizations such as the National Strength and Conditioning Association and the American College of Sports Medicine. (Offered as needed)

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 430: Phys & Biomech Aerobic Exer

Provides an in-depth, integrated understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to, and the biomechanics of, aerobic activity, exercise, and sport. Emphasizes the concept that the physiology of aerobic energy production and the biomechanics of aerobic energy use are linked in physical activity, exercise, and sport.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 440: Phys & Biomech Anaerobic Exer

Provides an in-depth, integrated understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to, and the biomechanics of, anaerobic activity, exercise, and sport. Emphasizes the concept that the physiology of anaerobic energy production and the biomechanics of anaerobic energy use are linked in physical activity, exercise, and sport.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 450: Exer Prescript for Special Pop

Focuses on the scientific and practical knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to design an individualized exercise prescription for those confronted with disease and special needs.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 452: Physiology of Aging

Examination of structural, physiological, psychological, and functional changes occurring in the older adult and implications for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of physical activity programs for the older adult population.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 454: Physical Activity Epidemiology

Provides students with an understanding of the benefits of physical activity on chronic disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life span, from clinical and public health perspectives. Discussion and application of real-life physical activity assessment, research, guidelines, and promotion in population levels. Students will examine the literature relative to the physiological impact of regular physical activity on chronic diseases.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 461: Stress Management

Students will understand stress and its effect on the body and mind. Students will identify and apply techniques to manage intrapersonal, interpersonal and community stressors at the level of the individual and community. The course focuses on understanding how stress is conceptualized and managed in diverse populations, settings, and at various periods of the lifespan.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 469: Kinesiology Internship

Students complete fieldwork in an agency and/or facility approved by the Kinesiology faculty. Approval is based on the opportunities available for students to work on issues of importance in Kinesiology and the agency's or facility's ability to provide mentoring and organizational support for the student intern.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 471S: Kinesiology Service Learning

Kinesiology majors will examine their personal and professional identities in areas of civic engagement, social justice and multicultural communities. Students will select a site relevant to the Kinesiology field and complete a minimum of 30 hours of service to an underserved population. Students will develop an understanding of health disparities, the context that surrounds them, and actions that professionals and institutions take to foster equity and inequity in communities. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 484: Facility Management

Provides a reference source for the design, construction, renovation, and/or maintenance of sports grounds and facilities. Speaks to the quality, evaluation, and safety of sport facilities including equipment, layout, and lighting and energy options in addition to reconstruction, renovation, maintenance, and management procedures.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 485: Sports Marketing

Covers the business of selling sport in our society. Explores the nuances of the sport business industry, sport management, and sport marketing. Describes and discusses the marketing mix: the strategic combination of four elements - product, price, place, and promotion - and segmentation, targeting, and position in the sport business.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 486: Sports Finance

Explores the importance of accounting and its resulting financial statements and data in the business of sport. Considers the complexities of today's business environment and the significance of applying adequate standard accounting procedures. Defines the role of accounting in sport and fitness enterprises; investigates the accounting system; looks at partnerships, cash management, revenue generation, and budgeting; and reviews the process of fundraising and friend-raising to cultivate human and fiscal resources.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 490: Evolutionary Medicine

The principles of evolutionary theory will be used to examine problems of medicine and public health. One theme will be the difference between proximate or direct cases of disease and the ultimate or evolutionary causes. The course will emphasize conditions of health and illness that require both proximate and ultimate explanations. Additionally, the course is designed to illustrate how an appreciation of the ultimate causes for disease may lead to new strategies for prevention and treatment.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 492: Healthy Skepticism

The course will emphasize principles of skeptical inquiry, scientific reasoning, and scientific evidence to prepare students to critically analyze promotional claims made in the health marketplace for products, services, and practices. The course is designed to help students distinguish health-related fact from fiction and to spot health-related schemes, scams, superstitions, sensationalism, fads, fallacies, frauds, bunk, and bunco.

Units: 3 — 3

KIN 494: Honors Seminar

Students pursue advanced study on specialized topics in Kinesiology. Students must have a GPA > 3.0 and/or Instructor Consent. (Prereq: KIN 300: Major Pro-Seminar (1 units))

Units: 1 — 3

KIN 497: Senior Capstone I

An in-depth assessment of knowledge, skills, and abilities for the Kinesiology profession; the course is intended for students who do not take KIN 499: Senior Capstone II (2 units). (Prereq: KIN 300: Major Pro-Seminar (1 units))

Units: 2 — 2

KIN 499: Senior Capstone II

Students prepare for and ultimately pass an approved professional certification exam related to the knowledge, skills, and abilities of the Kinesiology profession; the course is intended for students who do not take KIN 497: Senior Capstone I (2 units).

Units: 2 — 2

KIN 595: Special Topics

Enables graduate students to enrich Kinesiology 300 or 400 level courses to satisfy graduate level requirements. Prior to enrolling, students must seek instructor permission, provide a description of the course content, and submit a proposal to explain how additional and enriched graduate level assignments will be implemented. The course needs to be approved by the faculty advisor, course instructor, dean, and program director.

Units: 4 — 4

KIN 596: Sp Top Intern: Sport Mktg/Mgmt

Enables graduate students to enrich Kinesiology 300 or 400 level courses to satisfy graduate level requirements. Prior to enrolling in the course, students must seek instructor permission, provide a description of the course content, and submit a proposal to explain how additional and enriched graduate level assignments will be implemented. Needs to be approved by the faculty advisor, course instructor, dean, and program director.

Units: 4 — 4

KIN 597: Sport Facility Design & Mgmt

Enables graduate students to enrich Kinesiology 300 or 400 level courses to satisfy graduate level requirements. Prior to enrolling in the course, students must seek instructor permission, provide a description of the course content, and submit a proposal to explain how additional and enriched graduate level assignments will be implemented. Needs to be approved by the faculty advisor, course instructor, dean, and program director.

Units: 4 — 4