Human Communication courses

HCOM 112: English Communication Through Global Literatures

Through portfolio assessment, introduces students to college-level reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical thinking. Further develops reading skills through an examination of unique, transnational values represented in all literary genres from throughout the world. Develops the capability to understand, analyze, interpret, and appreciate literature of diverse cultures through written responses, oral presentations, and research papers. [Prereq: (CAD 95: Integrated Reading Writing (4 units) or EPT4 with Score of 147 or Higher)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Human Communication. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 196: Field Studies

Opportunities for independent field research projects involving oral history, social action writing, archival research, or investigative journalism.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 197: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 201: Philosophy of Human Nature

What does it mean to be human? How might we live meaningfully and well together? This course surveys representative theories and philosophical reflections that explore human nature and the nature of society, the state, and government with an emphasis on the experiential elements of meaningful human existence and notions of an ideal society.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 211: Reading Writing Crit Thkg

Through portfolio assessment, introduces students to college-level reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Further develops reading skills through a focus on divergent perspectives. Emphasizes the writing process to develop writings and a research paper. Develops empathic and critical listening skills through class discussion, peer workshops, interviews, and group presentations within a collaborative, interactive, and intercultural environment. [Prereq: (CAD 95: Integrated Reading Writing (4 units) or EPT4 with Score of 147 or Higher)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 211S: Reading, Writing and Critical Thinking SL

Introduces students to college-level reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Explores issues of identity, diversity, social justice, and service learning through academic study and participation in local community service settings. Further develops reading skills through a focus on divergent perspectives on themes of social responsibility, literacy, and educational equity. Emphasizes the writing process and develops empathic and critical listening skills through class discussion, peer workshops, community service, and group presentations within a collaborative, interactive, and intercultural environment. Requires a minimum of 30 hours community service work in addition to class time. [Prereq: (CAD 95: Integrated Reading Writing (4 units) or EPT4 with Score of 147 or Higher)]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 212: Dialogue and Deliberation-An Introduction

Dialogue and deliberation are communication processes that promote deeper understanding and better decision making about life's choices and challenges. Skill development in listening, inquiry, and reflection. Analytical and evaluative assessment of divergent perspectives, alternatives, and potential consequences in decision-making situations. Diverse ethical theories frame the exploration of communication-based controversies. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 213: Introduction to Communication Ethics

Introduction to the ethics of communication practices. Students identify, comprehend and interpret communication dilemmas in interpersonal, small group, intercultural, organizational or mass media contexts; they analyze the ethical controversies in these contexts and evaluate the communicative options suggested by different ethical frameworks. Students generate a personal and communal ethic to guide communication conduct. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 214: Interpersonal Comm & Conflict

This course introduces students to the dynamics of interpersonal communication and conflict resolution. Participants identify, comprehend, and interpret significant controversies, assess communicative options from different ethical frameworks, and develop knowledge and skills required to engage ethically and effectively across disagreement and other forms of difference. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 215: Digital Media and Society

Students will examine theoretical approaches to the role digital media technologies play in our culture and society today. The course will offer critical discussion of the digital technology uses and interactions and its impacts in the quality of communication and civic participation. The course will integrate both a debate about issues such as digital divide, digital literacy, Internet neutrality, ethics and privacy dilemmas; and it will include a hands-on exploration of digital media tools. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 221: Global Narratives

Examines unique and transnational cultural values represented in novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and film from Africa, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Europe, Latin America, and North America. Develops the capability to understand, analyze, interpret, and appreciate literature and diverse cultural forms, including film, as artistic and cultural representation. Meets the Subject Matter Requirement for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential for English/Literature. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 3 — 3

HCOM 223: American Indigenous Literatures and Cultures

Students study the literary expressions of Native peoples of the Americas. The course engages the literature as aesthetic, spiritual, and political expression. Examines the indigenous ways of being and knowing represented in the texts. Cultural aesthetics are studied within social and historical contexts, including but not limited to colonization, removals, assimilation, and resistance. Questions of cultural identity and sovereignty are central.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 225: Literature,Film & Culture

Introduces literary and film analysis through readings and viewings of selected global and/or American writers and films. Examines these authors' cultural heritage and traditions. Develops analytical and critical reading and viewing ability of literature and film through discussion of themes, characters, techniques, images, and structures. Explores the symbiotic relationship between literature and film in transmitting cultural values.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 226: Afro Cuba Hip Hop - Music and Dance in the Black Atlantic

Explores the social history of music and dance throughout the African Diaspora. Students learn specific styles from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Brazil and the United States including Afro-Cuban liturgical dance, rumba, salsa, samba, and hip hop. Students dance the music they study. Students become familiar with basic concepts in African Diaspora music and dance; identify and analyze trends therein; and develop a choreography based on the movements taught in class.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 227: Multicultural Poetry

Students focus on multicultural poetry as artistic and cultural representation. Students read works by poets of many cultures, watch poets read and talk about their work on video, and create their own original poetry. Students develop the tools to do literary and cultural analysis of poetry, as well as write their own poems.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 230: Environmental Creative Writing

Students explore environmental cross-cultural literature as artistic and socially conscious representations. Students read works by writers of diverse cultures and watch films and videos regarding environmental issues. Students develop the tools to do literary, cultural and environmental analysis. Students create original pieces about the environment using the basic elements of creative nonfiction, poetry and fiction.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 231: Latina/o Creative Wrtg Wrkshp

Students study the fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry of leading contemporary Latina/o authors with an emphasis on the historical, cultural, and socioeconomic influences on their work. Students use the work of these authors as models to create their own original pieces, incorporating the elements of craft.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 232: Creativity and Social Action

Examines the creative process and its application to social action. Uses guest writers and artists from local communities, videos, field trips, and cross-cultural readings to understand and analyze creativity and social action. Students produce collaborative creative projects. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 240: American Cultural Heritages

Traces the history of cross-cultural contact in the North American continent from the colonial period to the present. The course focuses on the formation and evolution of American cultures and identities, emanating from the lived experiences of everyday people. Students explore these histories using an interdisciplinary framework of United States multicultural heritages. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 242: Intro to Women's Studies

Introduces the basic concepts and perspectives in multicultural feminisms with special emphasis on the changing status of women in relationship to the U.S. and California Constitutions and political life. This learning experience provides the opportunity for students to develop analyses of the current political conditions for women and to strategize their own political participation in relation to these conditions. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 244: Latino USA: Ident/Experiences

Examines and compares the political experiences, cultural practices, and literary expressions of diverse Latino populations in the U.S. Topics include immigration, citizenship, demographics, work, religion, education, language, gender, and cultural rights. Readings include ethnographies, histories, novels, and films. Students design political projects. Crosslisted with SBS 244: Latino USA:Ident/Experiences (4 units).

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 245: Introduction to Mexican American Studies

Introduces students to the experiences of Chicana/o communities in the United States and in a transnational context. Students learn about Chicanos/as in relationship to issues of race, ethnicity, citizenship, class, gender, and other social formations. Students are introduced to Chicano/a historical experiences with an emphasis on understanding the struggles and social movements for justice and equality that have been foundational to the development of Chicano/a identities.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 247: African Legacy Worldwide

(Formerly titled Intr. African Diaspora Studies) Examines how historical, cultural, and social processes have influenced the development of African diaspora communities in the United States, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, and Asia. Special attention will be given to the impact of race and culture on the formation of diasporic communities. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 250: The History of Rock & Roll

Survey United States social and cultural history of the 20th century as analyzed through some of its popular music. Students use various methods employed by ethnic studies, history, and literature frameworks to analyze the roles that popular culture plays in the modern U.S. experience. Special emphasis is placed on the experiences of communities of color. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 251: Introduction to US History

Meets the Subject Matter Requirement for the Multiple Subject Teaching Credential for U.S. history. Covers a time period from the Colonial Era, the War of Independence and the Early Republic, Manifest Destiny and the expansion westward, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Immigration at the turn-of-the-century and the response of Nativists, Industrialization and Urbanization, through the Progressive Era. Takes a multicultural perspective and looks at the histories of diverse peoples in the struggle to realize democracy and freedom. Develops historical thinking skills as students deepen their understanding of the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics that characterized each era. =

Units: 3 — 3

HCOM 253: Out of Many: Histories Of US

Explores the complex histories of the diverse peoples of the United States from the U.S.-Mexican War to the present. Examines the past through the eyes of people often excluded from national narratives. Includes autobiographies, music, films and on-line field research. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 255: Global Social Movements

Students will study twentieth and twenty-first century global social movements through social movement theory and case studies to evaluate the claims, strategies, and efficacies of movements. Utilizing social movement theory out of cultural studies and sociology, normative political science, and ethnographic theoretical strategies students will familiarize themselves on a basic level with these social science approaches both singly and in interdisciplinary iterations. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 260: Politics & Participation

Explores the impact of movements for social and political justice on the interpretation and content of the U.S. Constitution. Students will develop their ethical understandings of democratic participation through historical and contemporary texts and then apply these new understandings through the creation of collective political projects. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 266: Histories of Democracy

The course explores the changing meaning of democracy and freedom from a multicultural perspective. It covers major events between the Colonial and Civil Rights eras, with a focus on the 1860s-1960s. The origins, key developments, and philosophies of the US and California Constitutions are studied as well as the role of social movements in struggles for social justice. Students also organize a political project that enables them to directly participate in the democratic process. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 267: US Political Histories

Historical view of the United States through analysis of the changing political process from the Revolutionary War and drafting of the Constitution to the social movements of the 20th century, with emphasis on various struggles for civil rights and liberties as waged in the courts, through direct political participation, and by civil disobedience; provides students an opportunity to apply tools of political action in practice. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 285: Intro to Photojournalism

Introduces the use of photography as a tool in reporting and interpreting news for print media. Students learn basic camera techniques and concepts of visual storytelling. Outcomes include learning to photograph subjects for the news media and telling stories through photography. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 300: Major ProSeminar

Introduces interdisciplinary, outcomes-based education in the humanities and communication. Explores content in the major learning outcomes and investigates the areas of specialization in the degree's concentrations. Students develop Individual Learning Plans. Examines opportunities in graduate education as well as related professional and career paths. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 2 — 2

HCOM 301: Ways Of Knowing

Surveys the changing relationships among knowledge, truth, and reality in different cultural and historical contexts; investigates, evaluates, and apply different ways of knowing such as analytic, rational, creative, spiritual, emotional, and intersubjective to substantive topics or themes. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 4 or the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics, Pre-Law, or Writing and Rhetoric. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 304: Relational Ethics

Students survey ethical decision-making processes through various relational philosophical frameworks. They also investigate, evaluate, and apply relational communication guidelines to the ethical dilemmas examined in interpersonal, small group, intercultural, and organizational situations. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 306: Gender and Communication

Explores theoretical explanations for the construction of gender. Identifies and examines the ways individuals communicate their gender identity to themselves and to others; identifies, examines, and analyzes the construction and communication of gender in media, interpersonal, intercultural, or rhetorical contexts in order to ethically and effectively interact with others. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 3 or the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics, Women's Studies, or Writing and Rhetoric. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 307S: Soc Impct Of Mass Media SL

Explores the relationship between the mass media and contemporary social problems. Media ownership, media and violence, and media representations of cultural identities will be examined. Students develop effective media literacy tools, and critically analyze media products. Involves students in media literacy programs in local schools and community organizations. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics or Journalism and Media Studies. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 307: Social Impact of Mass Media

Explores the relationship between the mass media and contemporary social problems. Issues such as media violence are explored from the perspective of consumers. Outcomes include raising awareness of the impact of media messages, developing effective media literacy tools, and preparing to critically analyze the cultural products we consume. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics or Journalism and Media Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 309: Interracial Communication

Students study the rhetorical construction of racial identity in the U.S. and its impact on contemporary interracial communication; they investigate and evaluate options for relating to interracial communication dilemmas ethically and effectively; and they develop ethical guidelines for interracial communication practices. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 3 or the concentrations in Peace Studies, Comparative American Studies, Practical and Professional Ethics or Writing and Rhetoric. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 310: Free Speech & Resp

Students survey the history of free speech in the United States; they examine past and present controversies such as obscenity, hate speech, and media sensationalism; they identify, evaluate, and assess human rights and responsibilities surrounding the freedom of expression from various philosophical perspectives. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 3 or the concentrations in Pre-Law; Practical and Professional Ethics; Journalism and Media Studies or Writing and Rhetoric. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 311: LS only:GWAR Pract Reason&Comm

Develop and apply abilities in oral and written communication and related critical thinking skills. Develops empathic and critical listening, reading, viewing, writing, and speaking skills for deliberation, problem solving, and community building. Students apply and assess reasoning and argumentative skills in oral, written, and visual communication contexts on various topics. For Liberal Studies students only. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 3 — 3

HCOM 312: Cooperative Argumentation-Theory and Practice

Introduction to cooperative argumentation. Students develop empathic and critical listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills for cooperative deliberation and problem solving practices; apply and assess reasoning and argumentative skills in oral and written communication contexts on various topics. Students learn how Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 1 or the concentrations in Peace Studies, Pre-Law, Practical and Professional Ethics or Writing and Rhetoric. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 313: GWAR Assessment

Alternative portfolio-based assessment of the Graduate Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). Provides no instruction in writing, oral communication, or critical thinking. Assumes students have already attained mastery of the outcomes. It is not an independent study. GWAR is required to graduate and should be completed at the beginning of the junior year. The recommended pathway for the fulfillment of GWAR is a GWAR-certified course. Students who believe they have completed written work that demonstrates fulfillment of the GWAR outcomes may seek instructor consent to enroll. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 315: Media for Social Change

Examines social transformation and the role of media initiatives and communication strategies in local and global contexts. Explores how media can promote social justice and democracy, teach sustainable living, foster dialogues on diversity, catalyze peace building, advocate for equality, and promote conversations on issues of social exclusion. This class offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or the concentrations in Journalism and Media Studies and Practical Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 316: Media Ethics

Develops media literacy and related knowledge, skills, and abilities. Explores implications of globalization on media production, distribution, and access, as well as on the content, context, consumption, and effects of media messages. Topics include media's role in democracy, what citizens have a right to expect from media and how media reflect and reinforce their social context. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or the concentrations in Journalism and Media Studies, or Practical and Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 317S: Advanced Composition, Composition Theories, Service Learning

In a service learning context, students deepen communication skills, engage contemporary composition theories, and develop advanced written communication skills in a variety of genres. Students apply theories in area schools and literacy programs. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 1 or the concentration in Writing and Rhetoric. Fulfills the English Subject Matter Preparation requirement in Communication Skills and the Field Experience requirement. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 318: GWARAdvCompTheory/PracK-8Teach

Introduces students to writing conventions, contemporary composition theories, and major forms of written expression such as expressive, interpretive, technical, rhetorical, argumentative, invitational, and creative. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 1 for Liberal Studies students only. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 319: Global Communication and Culture

This course offers students a critical understanding of the role of media and communication technologies in the processes of globalization. Drawing from historical and contemporary perspectives students will discuss the social, cultural and political implications of media's use and dissemination across the globe, and particularly in relation to issues such identity formation, community belonging, people's empowerment and political action around global challenges. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 320: Grammar, Usage, and Power

Introduces the basic elements and diverse linguistic attributes of the English language, and language theories, including universals and differences. Commonly practiced grammatical concepts and conventions and theories of language acquisition are studied and applied within the contexts of imperialism and post-colonial analysis. Explores the dynamics of current issues in language, including the roles of grammar in the schools, language in advertising, and variations in language usage. Offers built-in assessment for the concentration in Writing and Rhetoric. Required for the Single Subject in English Waiver Language Theories and Praxis Requirement. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 321: Rhetorical Traditions

Covers a diverse selection of rhetorical traditions from antiquity through contemporary times; investigates, analyzes, and evaluates major and recuperated historical figures and movements; explores the role of rhetoric in a variety of historical and cultural contexts; considers the relationships of rhetoric to epistemology, ethics, economics, spirituality, and politics. Offers build-in assessment for the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics or Writing and Rhetoric. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 322: Asian American Literature

Develops students' critical and analytical reading ability of literature from the perspective of the Asian American experience. Grounds the discussion of Asian American experiences, literatures, and cultures in history and theory. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies, or Literary and Film Studies. A literature course from GE Area C2 is recommended. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 323: American Drama

Examines the history of American drama. Explores the diverse cultures that have contributed to the shaping of the American drama. Introduces students to literary analysis through the study of the dialogical relationship between the "logical core" and the "non-logical texture." Offers built in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 324: African American Narratives

Examines the development of African American and African diaspora literature. Explores the quintessential role African American and African diaspora literature and culture have played in the development of American mainstream literature, culture, and identity. Looks at vernacular tradition, the call and response practice, and the lyrics of the blues-infused, African American literary expression. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Africana Studies, Literary and Film Studies, Comparative American Studies or History, Oral History and New Media. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 325: 20th Cent Narr Amer Immgr

Explores immigration to the United States from different cultural perspectives. Integrates a historiographic approach as the primary method for reading and critically interpreting immigrant narratives; uses historical events such as The Great Depression, World War I and II, and the Civil Rights Movement as markers for analyzing the texts. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Literary and Film Studies; Comparative American Studies; or History, Oral History & New Media Studies. Satisfactory completion of the U.S. Histories ULR, the Literature/Popular Culture ULR, and the Culture and Equity ULR also recommended. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 326: Jewish Holocaust Literature

Explores immigration to the United States from different cultural perspectives. Integrates a historiographic approach as the primary method for reading and critically interpreting immigrant narratives; uses historical events such as The Great Depression, World War I and II, and the Civil Rights Movement as markers for analyzing the texts. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Literary and Film Studies; Comparative American Studies; or History, Oral History & New Media Studies. Satisfactory completion of the U.S. Histories ULR, the Literature/Popular Culture ULR, and the Culture and Equity ULR also recommended. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3 and C2)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 327: Survey American Literature

Examines American literature through different historical periods, literary genres, and cultural movements. Develops ability to compare and contrast social, historical, and cultural experiences represented in literature. Students gain cross-cultural knowledge of American literary history, an introduction to literary theory, and further development of literary analysis skills. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. Meets the Single Subject in English Waiver Literary Histories, Theories, and Praxis Requirement. A literature course from GE Area C2 is highly recommended. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 328L: Digital Humanities Media Lab

A multimedia lab in digital humanities Focus on digitizing, editing and creatng images, audio, and video; online media research and copyright fair use. Recommended for students enrolled in HCOM courses employing digital humanities methods and practices and for students unfamiliar with I-Movie, Photoshop, sound editing, and online media research. (Coreq: HCOM 328: Latina Life Stories (4 units))

Units: 2 — 2

HCOM 328: Latina Life Stories

Explores intersections of ethnicity, race, gender, sexuality, and class through autobiographical and testimonial writings by Chicana, Mexican-origin, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and mixed-heritage Latinas in the U.S. Students produce multimedia digital stories about their own lives and identities. [(Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (Coreq: HCOM 328L: Digital Humanities Media Lab (2 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 329: Auto/Biografias

A bilingual English/Spanish course on autobiography, testimonio, life histories, and telenovelas (soaps). Students read and analyze written texts and films, keep journals, and do life writing or multimedia production in either Spanish or English. Requires the ability to understand spoken Spanish. [(Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (Coreq: HCOM 328L: Digital Humanities Media Lab (2 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 330: Intro Creative Writing

An introductory creative writing course that focuses on ethnicity, gender, and "witness" writing. Examination of the writing process, what roadblocks create silence, how to remove them. Cross-cultural readings in multicultural poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8 and half of the Liberal Studies HCOM Concentration in Creative Writing. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 330S: Intro to Creative Writing SL

Provides students the opportunity to be actively involved in the community. Students research and examine a particular public issue, and gain hands-on experience, knowledge, and skills about community sites. Students learn how to enter and exit communities sensitively, and participate in a multicultural community setting. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8 and half of the Liberal Studies HCOM Concentration in Creative Writing. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 331: Visual Art & Creative Writing

An introductory creative writing course focusing on ethnicity, gender, and social change, in relationship to visual arts. Cross-cultural readings in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. No previous art experience necessary. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 332: Poetry Writing Workshop

Poems with "duende," as Federico García Lorca says, are poems that "burn the blood like powdered glass." An intermediate level course that explores forms of poetry, both traditional and contemporary. Students analyze the creative process; move toward publishing poems. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8 (only with prior consent of instructor) or the concentration in Creative Writing and Social Action. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 330: Intro Creative Writing (4 units) or HCOM 330S: Intro to Creative Writing SL (6 units) or HCOM 339S: Creative Writing and Service Learning (6 units) or HCOM 331: Visual Art & Creative Writing (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 333: Women's Writing Workshop

An intermediate level creative writing workshop that examines women's lives, and their relationship to the writing process. Includes in-class writing exercises, cross-cultural readings, discussions of the writing process, and creative writing. For women and men honing their craft of writing poetry, fiction, life-stories. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8 (only with prior consent of instructor) or the concentrations in Creative Writing and Social Action, or Women's Studies. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 330: Intro Creative Writing (4 units) or HCOM 330S: Intro to Creative Writing SL (6 units) or HCOM 331: Visual Art & Creative Writing (4 units) or HCOM 339S: Creative Writing and Service Learning (6 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 334: Fiction/Creative NonFiction Wr

An intermediate-level creative writing workshop that focuses on fiction writing and creative non-fiction. Students explore forms of fiction, and move toward publication. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8 (only with prior consent of instructor) or the concentrations in Creative Writing and Social Action, Journalism and Media Studies or Writing and Rhetoric. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 330: Intro Creative Writing (4 units) or HCOM 330S: Intro to Creative Writing SL (6 units) or HCOM 339S: Creative Writing and Service Learning (6 units) or HCOM 331: Visual Art & Creative Writing (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 335: Amer Ethnic Lit & Culture

This learning experience takes a comparative approach to the examination of American ethnic literature and cultures. It is designed to develop students' ability to compare and contrast the social, historical, and cultural experiences as they are represented in literature. The interdisciplinarity nature of the course is accentuated not only through the introduction to the use of language and literary analysis, but also through the discussion of history, philosophy, culture, and social justice. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 336: Poetry and Gender

A literature course in contemporary multicultural poetry, with a focus on gender issues. "A new kind of man/a new kind of woman," (in the words of poet Muriel Rukeyser) names a central theme of 20th century American literature and life the re-imagining of women's and men's lives. Students examine poets' perspectives of gender shifts. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Literary and Film Studies, or Women's Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and C2)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 337: Women's Literature

Examines, through literature, how women writers are rewriting the myths and scripts of their/our lives, and how writing is a way of taking action. Explores how women have moved from repression to resistance, from silence to voice, from socially constructed divisiveness toward community. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Literary and Film Studies, or Women's Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3 and C2)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 338: Multicultural Adolescent Lit

Examines multicultural adolescent literature through the study of issues related to identity, race, culture, equity, and social justice/injustice over time. In particular, the course will provide opportunities to discuss the difficulties that young people have in coming to terms with these complicated issues. Required course for the Single Subject in English Waiver concentration, meeting the Multicultural Adolescent Literature Requirement. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3 and C2)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 339S: Creative Writing and Service Learning

Develops service learning sensitivity, creative writing competency and craft. Students develop original pieces and age-appropriate interdisciplinary creative projects for SL partners in the schools. Offers built-in assessment for HCOM MLO 8, the Concentration in Creative Writing and Social Action, HCOM Service Learning, and the CTC requirement in advanced writing in the classroom. Meets the English Subject Matter Preparation Program field experience requirement. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area A1 and GE Area A2)]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 340S: Topics in Social Movements Service Learning

Engages topical study of social movements in the service learning environment. Introduces various models of political organizing in movements that have addressed societal inequities from class, race, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, and other positionalities, and students apply these models to contemporary problems of inequity. The service learning component connects students with community organizations in order to be participant observers in contemporary organizing strategies. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 342: Feminist Theories & Methods

Explores modes of analysis that engage the intersectionality of gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, economic class, and (dis)ability. Readings and activities will ponder the ways that different feminist theoretical paradigms work to advance social justice. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Women's Studies or Comparative American Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 343: Race and Gender Justice

Examines the legal practices and scholarship that have intersected race and gender. We will read court cases that have shaped legal doctrine and essays that analyze and interpret that doctrine in order to understand the differing experiences of and conditions for women of all colors in relationship to gender justice. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Peace Studies, Women's Studies, Pre-Law. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 344: Chicana/Latina Experiences

Offers an intensive introduction to the roots, forms, and impacts of Chicana and Latina feminist discourses. Explores critical analyses of historical and contemporary Chicana/Latina life experiences while presenting theoretical frameworks such as transnationalism, intersectionality, and gender studies. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, History, Oral History and New Media, Comparative American Studies, or Women's Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 345: Chicano Life & Culture

Intensive introduction to Chicana/o and Latina/o cultural formations. Course has two objectives: to equip students with the analytical skills necessary to interpret the variety and particularity of the Mexican American and Latin American experiences; and, to expose students to an array of cultural experiences that have contributed to the formation of Chicana/o and Latina/o identities. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies, or Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 346: African American Life/History

An introduction to the historical and cultural narratives that shape African American identities and experiences. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Africana Studies; Comparative American Studies; or History, Oral History, and New Media. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 348: Race, Colonialism, and Film

Provides an opportunity to analyze and discuss the ways that film has portrayed issues of colonialism, race, culture, equity, power relationships, and identity over the past 100 years. We view films from various countries around the world, and we examine the historical, social, political, and artistic background of each film. Offers built-in assessment for HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies, History, Oral History and New Media or Literary and Film Studies. Also satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement in Multicultural Literature(s). (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 349: Environmental Philosophy and Communication

This class explores diverse environmental philosophies, and traces contemporary environmental groups' use of strategic communication. We study digital campaigns, branding tactics, public education programs, and theories of environmental justice. The course highlights a range of regional, national, and global case studies such as food systems, gas pipeline construction, commercial fish farms, climate change, and freshwater politics. Emphasizes the rhetorical foundations of environmental thought. (Credit/No Credit Available) (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 350: Oral Hist/Comm Mem

Students design and conduct oral history projects in surrounding communities. Projects address social issues of significance to the student and the community involved. Interviews are archived in the CSUMB Oral History and Community Memory Archive. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or, depending on the topic, Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies. Meets the Single Subject in English Waiver Technology requirement. [Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (D2 or D2)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 350S: Oral Hist/Comm Mem SL

Working in a local community, students design and conduct a collaborative oral history project of significance to students and community alike. Interviews will become part of the CSUMB Oral History and Community Memory Archive. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (D2 or D2)]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 351: Modern World History

Critical and comparative survey of modern world history since the 18th century. Focuses on social, political, and cultural histories of ordinary people and how they shaped and were shaped by state formation, global trade and exchange, capitalist transformation, industrialization, political ideologies, and nationalism. Incorporates history of the U.S. - its formation and transformation into global history framework. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7, or the concentration in Single Subject in History and Social Sciences Waiver. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 352: History According To Movies

"It comes as a great shock to see Gary Cooper killing off the Indians and, although you are rooting for Gary Cooper, that the Indians are you" (James Baldwin, African American writer, 1965). We learn a good deal about the past by watching movies. This course explores how film shapes and reflects U.S. history. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies; History, Oral History, and New Media; Journalism and Media Studies; or Literature and Film Studies. [Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (D2 or D2)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 353: California At Crossroads

Brings a historical perspective to contemporary issues facing California, from immigration and racism to the future of public culture and the environment. Students explore the cross-cultural history of California and participate in hands-on research into California's past. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies; or History, Oral History, and New Media. Meets the Single Subject Waiver in History/Social Science requirement in California History. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 354: Whose America?

Explores struggles over whom and what will be remembered in national and local history by involving students in hands-on research into the past. Covers the culture wars taking place in politics, the media, museums, and state parks across the country. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies; or History, Oral History, and New Media. Meets the Single Subject History/Social Science Waiver in Modern U.S. History. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 356: Multicultural History

Explores the complex experiences of African Americans, Asian Americans, Chicana/os, European Americans, and Native Americans in U.S. history. Combines the use of traditional written sources, such as autobiographies, with new media technologies, such as the Internet, and multimedia presentations. Requires basic computer experience. Offers built-in assessment in for HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies; Literary and Film Studies; or History, Oral History, and New Media. Meets the Single Subject in English Waiver Teaching with New Media Requirement and Technology Requirement. Meets the Single Subject History/Social Science Waiver in Modern U.S. History. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (Coreq: HCOM 356L: Multicultural Hstry: Media Lab (2 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 356L: Multicultural Hstry: Media Lab

A multimedia lab in digital history/storytelling. Instruction in digitizing, editing and creation of images, audio, and video; online media research and copyright fair use. Recommended for students enrolled in HCOM 356: Multicultural History (4 units) who are unfamiliar with I-Movie, Photoshop, sound editing, and online media research. (Coreq: HCOM 356: Multicultural History (4 units))

Units: 2 — 2

HCOM 357: Constitutional Law

Introduction to constitutional law through an in-depth examination of select U.S. Supreme Court cases. Close attention to how constitutional law has shaped and been shaped by the experience of ordinary people and the impact of the court's decisions on the social, political, and economic histories of the United States from a multicultural perspective. Offers built-in assessment in the concentration Pre-Law. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 358: Crit Perspect on Law inSociety

Broadly introduces law in society from interdisciplinary global perspectives. Focuses on intersections of law with everyday life and how law is shaped by and shapes its social context. Special attention to how race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation relate to law and legal systems. Offers built-in assessment in the concentrations in Pre-Law or Comparative American Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 359: Sexuality, Law and History

Examines the historical, legal, and social construction of sexuality from the perspective of multicultural communities in the United States. Emphasis on histories of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Pre-Law; History, Oral History, and New Media; Comparative American Studies or Women's Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 360: Constitutional History

Intensive study of the U.S and California Constitutions from a historical perspective, focusing on the relationship of social, political, and economic transformation to constitutional jurisprudence. The course explores the relationship of the states to the federal government, civil rights and liberties, and the contested meanings of freedom, liberty and equality under the law. Provides opportunities for students to use historical perspectives to understand and advocate for solutions connected. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 361: Crime and Communities

Explores relationship of the criminal justice system to various kinds of communities; includes a focus on the intersection of criminal justice with race, ethnicity, class, age, sexuality, sexual orientation, and gender identity. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 363: Topics in Social History

Often described as history from the bottom up, social history has become critical to how many historians have approached the history of ordinary people. This course introduces students to commonly used theories, methods and practices in social history scholarship and historical writing with a primary emphasis on the history of the United States. (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 364: History of the American West

Explores the history of the Trans-Mississippi West in the United States through the late 20th century, focusing on complex interactions of diverse cultural groups in their social, economic, political and environmental dimensions. (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 365: Chicana/o Latina/o History

Advanced introduction to the historical experiences of people of Mexican and Latin American descent in the U.S. Explores a variety of forces which have shaped and continue to shape the lives of these communities. Emphasizes the historical and sociological method used to analyze these experiences, with primary focus on the 20th century. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7, or the concentrations in Chicana/o- Latina/o Studies; History, Oral History, and New Media; or Comparative American Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 366: History of Religion in the United States

Introduce students to the history of various religious traditions in the United States, particularly the intersection of religion with nationalism, legal and political institutions, identity formation, and the struggle over the meaning of religion in diverse multicultural communities. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 367: Gender and United States History

This course explores the role of gender in shaping the historical experiences and analysis of those experiences by historians of the United States with an emphasis on the intersection of gender with other social categories, including race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation among others. (Credit/ No Credit Available) (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 368: Civil War and Reconstruction in the United States

This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War, from the 1840s to 1877, organized around four broad themes: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation; the experience of modern, total war for individuals and society; and the political and social challenges of Reconstruction. The course explores national, sectional, racial, constitutional, individual, social, intellectual, and/or moral dimensions of the period. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 369: Asian American History

A survey of the major events, people, places and themes that have shaped Asian migration, racialization and resistance in the U.S. from the 1800s to the present. Provides both macro and micro vantage points, both national and transnational, revealing how changes in the world economy, legislation and racial attitudes reveal the interconnectedness between different Asian groups, between Asians and other groups and possibilities for conflict, resistance and agency in different historical contexts. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 370: Media and the Military

This course is designed to provide both practical and theoretical frameworks in which to analyze communications and media work with the U.S. military. Students who wish to pursue careers in media, or with the military will learn practical skills for navigating media issues with the U.S. military. The course also is suitable for those who wish to participate in theoretical discussions about media representation of the military and military topics such as gender, race, and sexuality. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 371: Community Journalism Studies

This course serves as an introduction to the history, technologies, theories and concepts of mass media. It also explores the role we play today as both consumers and producers of media. Specifically, students will engage in the study of journalism's role in reflecting a community voice and facilitating dialogue for community betterment. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 373: Introduction to Public Relations

Introduces students to the history, evolution, principles and basic practices of modern public relations. Students study theories of the public and public relations and build skills in crafting and distributing effective communication campaigns. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 383: Genres of Social Justice Writing

Intermediate level writing and research course where students engage in theory and practice of professional and technical genres for social advocacy. Students use primary and secondary research methods and collaborate to produce proposals, reports, visual and multimedia communication, and other professional and technical texts for community advocacy and outreach. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 385: Reporting

Prepares students to conduct journalistic interviewing, newswriting and reporting from a local, community perspective. Outcomes include learning basic and advanced journalistic interviewing techniques, information gathering and independent research, and critical news source evaluation, ethical decision making; and journalistic writing of news, editorial, and feature articles for print and digital media. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 387: Media Production Lab

Prepares students to successfully create multi-media journalistic products. Outcomes include learning the basic concepts of visual communication and journalistic production using modern technology and software. Students working on the Otter Realm are strongly encouraged to enroll. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units)) or Instructor Consent]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 388: Investigative Reporting

Prepares students to conduct in-depth and investigative reporting. Outcomes include learning advanced journalistic interviewing techniques, information gathering, and critical understanding of news sources. Focuses on the journalistic exploration of current social, economic, political, and environmental issues. Requires instructor consent. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 389: Otter Realm Workshop

Students are responsible for publishing the Otter Realm campus newspaper. Outcomes include learning journalistic writing and reporting techniques such as interviewing, information gathering, and writing news and feature stories, as well as media analysis skills. Students learn in a fast-paced, working newsroom environment to produce newspaper content. Instructor consent required. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 390: Magazine Writing

Prepares students to report and write magazine articles about social issues. Outcomes include learning advanced journalistic and creative nonfiction interviewing, reporting techniques, and writing short feature and in-depth magazine stories. Focuses on training students to write a magazine story from conception and pitching the story to a magazine through reporting, organizing, writing, rewriting, and editing. Requires instructor consent. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Human Communication. (Offered occasionally.) (Letter Grade Available)

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 395S: Special Topic:Service Learning

With faculty sponsorship and oversight, students design, develop, and teach a particular topic in Human Communication.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 396: Field Studies

Opportunities for independent field research projects involving oral history, social action writing, archival research, or investigative journalism.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 396S: Field Studies Service Learning

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 397S: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 398: Legal Studies Internship

Opportunity for independent internship involving any area of legal studies. Offers built-in assessment for HCOM Pre-Law concentration or elective in Pre-Law minor.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 403S: Ethics in the Professions:SL

Participants develop and apply knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to identify and ethically address moral challenges commonly experienced in professional life. Reciprocal partnerships within the community provide opportunities for students to engage in projects designed to foster ethical and effective communication, to empower recipients of public services, and to facilitate fulfillment of organizational goals and commitments. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 3 or the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics or Pre-Law. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 403: Ethical Issues

Through exploration and application of diverse moral frameworks, students acquire knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to identify and ethically resolve complex moral issues commonly associated with a variety of professions. Participants also gain insight into how to help establish and sustain environments conducive to ethical reflection and practice. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 3 or the concentrations in Pre-Law or Practical and Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 404: Restorative Justice

Students explore diverse models of justice as philosophies and practices. The epistemological, ethical, political, and spiritual dimensions of restorative justice are studied in cross-cultural contexts. Offers built-in assessment for HCOM MLO 4 or the concentrations in Peace Studies, Pre-Law, or Practical and Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 405: Philosophy and Sexualities

Students explore the social construction of sexuality. Epistemological, ethical, political, and spiritual dimensions of sexuality are studied in cross-cultural contexts. Offers built-in assessment for HCOM MLO 4 or the Concentration in Practical and Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 406: Philosophy According to Movies

Introduces classical philosophical questions, such as the nature of good and evil, reality, and efforts to understanding self and community, through stories and film. Visual media integrate with classical and contemporary readings in philosophy enabling students to learn about the problems, methods and insights in philosophical analysis. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 410: Public Relations Ethics and Practices

Students will study public relations models and theories, as well as practical public relations skills to better interact with myriad publics. Participants will explore multiple ethical frameworks and apply them to the numerous issues facing public relations professionals. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 411: Media Law and Policy

Students develop an understanding of laws and policies regulating media industries, and those related to the public as both producers and consumers of media content, by examining legal cases and contemporary case studies. The course covers the 1st Amendment, the FCC, defamation, privacy, fair use, social media and more. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 412: Multicultural Conflict Resolut

Explores theories and methods of conflict resolution. Participants apply multicultural approaches to problem solving in personal, professional, and social contexts. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 3 or the concentrations in Peace Studies, Pre-Law, or Practical and Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 420: Adv Studies Rhetorical Theory

Students interpret, analyze, and evaluate a selection of rhetorical theories or theoreticians in comparative, cultural, global, historical, and political frameworks. They consider their roles as practitioners, consumers, and critics of rhetoric; they apply elements derived from their study of the theories to rhetorical topics. The specific content will vary each semester. Offers build-in assessment for the concentrations in Practical and Professional Ethics or Writing and Rhetoric. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 421: Social History of English Lang

A study of the history of the English language within imperialism and post-colonialism, emphasizing morphological changes in the language. Explores sociolinguistic, psycholinguistic, and current linguistic theory and makes practical applications. Analyzes language development theories and current issues in language, including standardization, bilingualism, language variations, gender, literacy, and language in the schools, and methods of teaching reading. Offers built-in assessment in MLO 6 or meets the Single Subject in English Waiver Language and Linguistic Theories and Praxis Requirement. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 422: SelTop Multicultural Rhetorics

Explores in-depth a selection of one or more rhetorical traditions outside the traditional Western rhetorical canon; utilizes interdisciplinary methodologies to investigate and analyze the cultural concept and role of rhetoric in relationship to epistemology, ethics, spirituality, economics, and politics; examines developments in cultural rhetorical traditions in relationship to cross-cultural encounters, including but not limited to colonialism and postcolonialism. Offers build-in assessment in MLO 5 or the concentration in Writing and Rhetoric or or Practical and Professional Ethics. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 423: Rhetoric of Religion

This course examines ways in which religion plays a significant role in constituting both community and controversy in various contexts. Rhetorical theory and method, as well as a critical cultural studies perspectives, will be used to analyze how religious rhetoric and rhetoric about religion can draw groups of people together or divide them. [(Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 424: Latin American Media and Pop Culture

A bilingual English/Spanish course that explores the role and impact of multiple media platforms and cultural products in Latin America, along with the intersecting political and social movements, and technological advancements. Through an interdisciplinary framework students will critically examine mass media and pop culture in the 20th and 21st centuries and advance their Spanish language skills through readings, discussion, lecture and writing. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 425: Post-Colonial Lit and Film

Examines the emergence of non-Western voices and perspectives in literature and films from the post-colonial "South," that is, regions of the world that have experienced or continue to experience colonial or neo-colonial rule. Regions include: Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Oceania. Texts include autobiographies, testimonios, plays, novels, and films. Meets built-in assessments for HCOM MLO 6 (Comparative Literary Analysis) or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. Meets the Single Subject Waiver in History/Social Studies Non-Western requirement. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 426: Travel Narratives

Travel narratives relate journeys to home audiences, portray the "other," and reveal the culture and "self" of the traveler. Examines the historical, literary, and cultural significance of narratives of discovery, conquest, colonization, exploration, and tourism in the Americas. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3 and D2)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 427: Survey of British Literature

Examines representative works by British writers from different periods: Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, Realist, Modern and Post-Modern. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. Meets the Single Subject in English Waiver Literary Histories, Theories, and Praxis Requirement. A literature course from the Literature/Popular Culture ULR is recommended. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 428: Contemporary Chicana Poetry

Analyzes the works of Chicana poets of the 20th and 21st centuries, among them Lorna Dee Cervantes, Pat Mora, Ana Castillo, Sandra Cisneros, Demetria Martinez, and Diana Garcia. From the rural to the urban experience, students study the historical, cultural, and political determinants that define the work as Chicana. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentrations in Literary and Film Studies; Chicana/o- Latina/o Studies; or Women's Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 429: BritLit& Engl Lang Perspective

Examines works by British writers from Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, Realist, Modern, and Post-Modern literary periods. Explores literature as both literary and linguistic text. Applies postcolonial approaches to literature and explores current linguistic theories and sociolinguistic approaches. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6. Meets requirements in the Single Subject English Waiver concentration for English Literary Histories, Theories, and Praxis, and for Language and Linguistic Theories and Praxis. A ULR literature course from Literature/Popular Culture is recommended. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 432: Social Action Writing

An intermediate level creative writing and research intensive course. Students do collaborative research and interviews in the community. They create poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and mixed media work towards a final public presentation. Assessment in Creative Writing Social Action; History; Oral History and New Media; or Writing and Rhetoric concentrations. HCOM MLO 8 only with prior consent of instructor. [Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 330: Intro Creative Writing (4 units) or HCOM 330S: Intro to Creative Writing SL (6 units) or HCOM 339S: Creative Writing and Service Learning (6 units) or HCOM 331: Visual Art & Creative Writing (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 432S: Social Action Writing

Intermediate level creative writing course in which students apply craft to a particular public issue. Students do collaborative research and interviews in the community. They produce poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, and visual representations of their writings. End-of-semester project is used to educate the community. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 8 (With prior consent) or the concentration in Creative Writing and Social Action or History, Oral History and New Media Studies. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 330: Intro Creative Writing (4 units) or HCOM 330S: Intro to Creative Writing SL (6 units) or HCOM 339S: Creative Writing and Service Learning (6 units) or HCOM 331: Visual Art & Creative Writing (4 units))]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 433: Life Stories & Life Writing

Read, analyze, and create life stories. Explores memory and intersecting identities of ethnicity, race, class, gender, and sexuality through multicultural life narratives about family, migration, work, education, and community. Develops creative writing, literary analysis, and multimedia skills. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 and MLO 8, or the concentrations in Creative Writing and Social Action; History, Oral History and New Media Studies; or Literary and Film Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 8 — 8

HCOM 434: Creative Publishing and Critical Storytelling

An advanced course in the creation of journalistic products that critically explore contemporary topics and public issues. These productions, strategically designed for community engagement, include interactive visual stories, podcasts, and infographics. Builds on basic digital tools knowledge gained in HCOM 387. [(Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 387: Media Production Lab (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 435: Community Media Project

Explores the technical, journalistic, and social empowerment aspects of mass media products. Students help a community group create a media project, such as a newsletter, public service campaign, or website. Outcomes include applying advanced concepts of visual communication and journalistic production, as well as digital media techniques. [(Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 436: Literature of Sexualities

Students analyze the literary criticism that offers criteria for defining multicultural gay, lesbian, bisexual, transsexual, and transgender literary tradition(s). They then explore canonized, non-canonical, and marginalized texts in relationship to issues of sexuality and authorship, content, genre, and form. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 437: Shakespeare

Analyzes Shakespeare's plays from classical, modern, postmodern, and postcolonial perspectives, and meanings in the colonial and postcolonial world. Covers Shakespeare's plays from comedies and histories to tragedies and romances. Explores the symbiotic relationship between literature and film. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. Meets the Single Subject in English Waiver Literary Histories, Theories, and Praxis Requirement. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 438: Author(s): Canon and Context

Students analyze the works of one or two authors and study the historical, social, and political contexts of their work in-depth. Varying content each semester. Please contact professor about which authors will be studied. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 440: Leadership and Community

Explores the dynamics of American social and political structures and the relationship to culture. Examines the roots of racism, sexism, and classism with a special emphasis on leadership development and community participation. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Comparative American Studies; Practical and Professional Ethics; Women's Studies; Pre-Law; or Peace Studies (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 443: Black Feminist Theory & Praxis

Explores the development of black feminism as both a conceptual framework and from a political practice. Examines black feminism from a comparative perspective and within a global context. Special attention will be given to black feminist thought and activism in Africa, the United States, England, and Brazil. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Africana Studies, Comparative American Studies, Literary and Film Studies, or Women's Studies. (Prereq: GE Area A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 445: Slavery & Race in the Americas

Examines the cultural, social, and political dimensions of slavery and race relations in Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States. Readings and class discussions explore the development of slavery in countries such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Examines the impact of nationalist ideologies on contemporary racial dynamics in the region. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7 or the concentrations in Africana Studies; History, Oral History, and New Media; or Comparative American Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 446: EthnograpPortraits/Culture Cit

Through theoretical readings, films, and ethnographic case studies, students explore how racialized, colonized, and other excluded indigenous or transnational communities construct, claim, and struggle for human, social, and cultural rights and identities. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or the concentrations in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies; Comparative American Studies; or History, Oral History, and New Media. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3 and D1 and D2)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 447: Explore the African Diaspora

Exploring the African Diaspora is a 4-week course, which includes a two-week study trip. It provides an introduction to African Diasporic societies and cultures. Students attain an overview of slavery, race and gender relations, political mobilizations, African Diasporic religions, music and literatures. Learning activities include language study, guided tours and museum visits, lectures, performances, and meetings with anthropologists, historians, and artists. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 451: Transnational Migrations

Examines recent theories related to migration including nationalism and the nation, transnationalism, diaspora, borders/borderlands, and globalization. Surveys key theories and compares histories of specific transnational communities, focusing primarily on migrations between Asia/Asia Pacific and the Americas. Offers built-in assessment for HCOM MLO 7 Historical Analysis, and concentrations in Comparative American Studies; Chicana/o Latina/o Studies; and History, Oral History, and New Media. Also applicable to the Chicana/o Studies Minor. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 452: Literature into Film

Students analyze literature such as the novels of Henry James, E.M. Forster, William Burroughs, Toni Morrison, Amy Tan, and Stephen King, and they also view critically the films made from such literature. Throughout the course, students explore and revise criteria for determining both the strengths and the limitations of each art form. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 6 or the concentration in Literary and Film Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 454: History of Victorian Britain

This course examines the key social and ideological influences that shaped the dominant concerns of Victorian Britain. Among these concerns are the roles of men and women, industrialization, class struggle, sexuality, racial difference, poverty and disease, education, and social change. Drawing on a wide range of textual evidence, the course provides opportunities to explore and apply methods of socio-cultural historical research and offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 7. (Prereq: GE Areas A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 455: Paradigms Of Chicano Comm

Explores emerging intellectual paradigms in the Chicano community and traces their antecedents and relationships. Provides an intensive foundation in Chicano studies theory and emergent issues. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 5 or the concentrations in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies; or Comparative American Studies. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 472: Adv Int Stdy:Pwr to the People

Students explore an advanced interdisciplinary issue in the humanities from at least two perspectives. The course is team-taught by two faculty members. Offers built-in assessment in two MLOs or concentration(s) determined by the instructors. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 8 — 8

HCOM 473: Senior Seminar

Students explore an advanced specialty issue in Human Communication in a small, interactive, seminar format. The in-depth study required directly relates to the professor's current research or pedagogy in Human Communication. Counts toward the concentration(s) determined by HCOM. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Prereq: GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3)

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 474: Research Methods

Senior level HCOM research seminar designed to helps students develop, commence and sustain the complex research skills expected of an HCOM graduate. Students deepen their research skills, including but not limited to the ability develop a scholarly research question and project, determine information required, identify where to find needed information, and the skills needed to obtain, synthesize, and integrate information. Subject focus may vary. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 2 — 4

HCOM 475: Senior Capstone

Students produce a complex, interdisciplinary senior research project related to an issue or topic within the Human Communication major and their Depth Concentration. Students present their project in a public Capstone Festival. Required for all HCOM majors applying for graduation. Instructor Consent required.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 486: Mass Media Internship

Students receive class credit for working in a real news organization, such as the public relations office of a business or community organization, in an advertising agency or any other media organization. They learn with support from both an internship adviser and a mentor at the organization where they work. Requires 300 hours of work and participation in online class. Offers built-in assessment of concentration or credit in Journalism and Media Studies. (Prereq: HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units) or HCOM 389: Otter Realm Workshop (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 487S: Community Media Project SL

Explores the technical, journalistic, and social empowerment aspects of creating a mass media product. Students help a community group create a media project, such as a newsletter, public service campaign, or website. Outcomes include learning the basic concepts of visual communication and journalistic production, as well as digital media techniques when appropriate. Offers built-in assessment in HCOM MLO 2 or the concentration in Journalism and Media Studies. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 384 or HCOM 389: Otter Realm Workshop (4 units))]

Units: 6 — 6

HCOM 488: Investigative Reporting

Prepares students to conduct in-depth and investigative reporting. Outcomes include learning advanced journalistic interviewing techniques, information gathering, and critical understanding of news sources. Focuses on the journalistic exploration of current social, economic, political, and environmental issues. Requires instructor consent. [(Prereq: (GE Area A1 and A2 and A3) and (HCOM 385: Reporting (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Human Communication. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 496: Field Studies

Opportunities for independent field research projects involving oral history, social action writing, archival research, or investigative journalism.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 498: Legal Aid Internship

Internship with a legal aid organization in the local community. Explores such issues as legal ethics, the justice gap and access to legal services while providing hands on training. (Credit/ No-Credit Available) [(Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 546: Cultural Citizenship/Latino

A graduate course on the theory and practice of cultural citizenship. Explores how Latina/o and other marginalized or excluded communities claim rights to human, social, and cultural equality through cultural difference. Open to any CSUMB graduate student.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 555: Paradigms Of Chicano Comm

Explores emerging intellectual paradigms in the Chicano community and traces their antecedents and relationships. Provides an intensive foundation in Chicano studies theory and emergent issues. Open to any CSUMB graduate student.

Units: 4 — 4

HCOM 595: Special Topics

For students interested in the oral history of the Fort Ord Conversion Project. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 596: Field Studies

Opportunities for independent field research projects involving oral history, social action writing, archival research, or investigative journalism.

Units: 1 — 6

HCOM 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6