Global Studies courses

GS 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Global Studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 8

GS 196: Field Studies

Individualizes student placement for field study as related to global studies.

Units: 1 — 6

GS 197: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

GS 200: Politics of Everyday Life

Looks at contemporary political life by recognizing the public, historical, and political dimensions of daily life. Examines American and California government and politics by analyzing historical and political events that affect people's daily lives. Focuses on domestic and global influences and their interaction on the laws and structures that govern people's lives.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 206: Understanding Globalization

Globalization is an uneven process. It is the intensification of economic, political, social and cultural relations across international borders. Students will understand the history and the key features of the pro and anti-globalization debates. They will follow how popular struggles for social justice and equity have shaped the global order.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 210: United States in World History

Seeks to place the historical experience of the United States in a comparative and global framework. Compares selected themes in US history (colonial experience, revolution, slavery, racial conflict, industrialization) with similar experiences elsewhere in the world. Focuses attention on US interaction with other regions of the world through immigration, imperialism, and the emergence of the United States as a global superpower.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 214: Global History I: Ancient Times to 1500

Explores the history of humankind from the early city states of the Middle East through the advent of global connections around 1500. Focuses on the major civilizations (China, India, Middle East, Americas, Europe) as expressed through the arts, religion and trade relations.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 215: Global History II - World History Since 1500

Explores the history of humankind from roughly 1500 to 2000. Highlights the processes of globalization on the diverse populations of the world as expressed through the arts, religion, intellectual discourses, economic activity, and cultural self determination. Explores issues of the rise of European domination and the era of revolutions and independence movements.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 225: Global Voices

This course examines the global issues and topics through analysis and interpretation of works of art, film, literature, and performance from around the world. Many of the works present the perspectives of those who are caught in the challenging world of "global flows and disjunctures", where people, ideas, money, and technologies move quickly around the world, but in unequal and random ways that cause poverty, violence, social dysfunction, and humanitarian crises... (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 4 — 4

GS 230: World Religions

This class will introduce students to a number of religious traditions in their classical and contemporary practices. Through academic study of religion, students consider how various disciplines approach the myths, stories, symbols, rituals, ideas, and ethical practices of these religions. This introduction will provide a framework within which to reflect on one's own experiences. Traditions include: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 240: Introducing International Relations

Introduction to important theoretical approaches to the analysis of international relations as they relate to security, global justice and foundations for a peaceful world. A review of basic international relations concepts and methods is integrated with applications of these approaches to a number of historical and contemporary issues in global politics including: the causes of war, international institutions, globalization, nuclear weapons proliferation, terrorism, and human rights.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 251: Intro to Global Economics

Covers basic micro and macroeconomic principles in relation to policies and real-world case studies from gender, ethical, and global perspectives. Students learn key economic concepts that affect their lives, along with the social/cultural contexts of major economic thinkers who coined those economic principles. It presents social scientific methods of inquiry in multiple social science lenses. Students learn feminist, environmental, and Global South perspectives.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 280S: Globalize This

If you ask most people where globalization occurs, they will tell you 'out there' - not in the US. We consider how local problems are set in systems of inequity and discrimination, linking the US to their expression elsewhere. As a Service Learning course, students will volunteer in organizations, link local and global dimensions of problems and consider meaning of service.

Units: 6 — 6

GS 300: Major ProSeminar

Students acquire a basic foundation in globalization and social theories and methods through exploration of current issues. Required entry into the Global Studies major. (Prereq: GS 206: Understanding Globalization (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

GS 311: US Foreign Policy in Asia/Latin America

Focus on U.S. foreign policy in select countries in South or Central Asia, Asia Pacific, and Latin America as well as selected developing countries. Pays particular attention to U.S. diplomatic, economic, and military relations.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 316: Approaches/ Global Histories

Examines the application of historical approaches to themes related to past and contemporary societies. This course focuses particularly on global histories, which set historical problems beyond the frame of nations or regions. (Prereq: GS 214: Global History I: Ancient Times to 1500 (4 units) or GS 215: Global History II - World History Since 1500 (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

GS 317: Global Migrant Workers

Examines how globalization, global labor migration, global supply chains, multinational corporations and global civil society organizations have affected working conditions and labor rights around the world from the late 20th to early 21st centuries. Emphasizes social, political and economic effects of globalization and outsourcing on workers in the U.S., Mexico, and Asia Pacific. Explores the abuses, challenges and opportunities for migrant workers.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 318: Comparative and Mixed Methods

Focuses on case-oriented approach which compares cases treated as holistic entities. It interprets specific cases and addresses historical specificity in a small number of cases (such as countries, communities). It explores combined strategies including variable-oriented analyses supplemented with case studies, and case studies reinforced with quantitative analyses, as well as global social phenomena explored within their contexts using a variety of data sources and multiple conceptual lenses.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 320: Global Issues & 3rd World

Identifies and critiques various important global issues that have particularly adverse effects on the Global South countries. Students comprehend, analyze, and evaluate the role played in the Third World or Global South by the more powerful states, corporations and civil society of the First World or Global North.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 322: Dilemmas in Humanitarianism

This course critically examines theories and practices of humanitarianism - the principles of foreign intervention in situations of crisis, and in 'weak,' 'failing,' and post-conflict states. The course assesses the effects of humanitarian intervention on local realities and global relations in the post-Cold War period.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 325: International Development

Offers a historical route through both grand theories and mini-narratives of international development, covering Modernization theory, Dependency Theory, the Basic Needs movement and the Human Development Index, 'Anti-developmentalism,' Sen's capabilities approach and Nussbaum's contributions to that framework, the neoliberal structural adjustment period, and its backlash. Students are challenged to question what is meant by 'development,' and to assess critically the ideas that have shaped approaches to international development in the 20th century.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 326: US Foreign Policy

An introduction to the institutions, processes, and debates of United States foreign policy. Examines the actors involved, both governmental and non-governmental, and offers an institutional and functional analysis of the national and international factors that shape U.S. foreign policy. Among the topics covered are: theories of how the foreign policy making process works; models of decision making process; tensions between democracy and foreign policy; the media and U.S. foreign policy; and current debates in U.S. foreign policy.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 327: US Foreign Policy in the Middle East

An examination of the significant events and underlying historical and political dynamics that continue to guide the conception and application of United States foreign policy towards the Middle East from the collapse of the Ottoman Empire to the current polarization of the region. Includes discussion of the major ideational and ideological trends in the United States that have shaped US foreign policy in the region.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 328: US Intelligence & Democracy

A critical examination of the methods civilian authorities in democracies use to establish strong, effective controls over their intelligence agencies. Begins with an overview of the intelligence process in the US and Britain, and problems posed for democratic governance. Focus shifts to case studies in Latin America, Central Europe, Africa, and Asia, and efforts to establish democratic controls over intelligence and the challenges that such nations will face in the future.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 329: Middle East Conflict

This course seeks to provide an understanding of how international, regional, and intra-state conflicts have shaped contemporary political trends in the Middle East. Using a case study approach, this course will explore key concepts such as revolution, insurrection, regime change, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, regional rivalry, great power intervention, and conflict management to facilitate comparative analysis of conflicts in the  region.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 330: World Views

Introduces diverse religious, spiritual, philosophical, ideological, scientific, technological, and gender views or perspectives. Focuses on the similarities and differences between worldviews and how those people interact with the world. Students study the adverse effects of ethnocentrism, reflect on their own worldview, and empathize with people with differing worldviews.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 332: Religion in a Post Secular World

We now live in a "post-secular" world. We will cover the nature and debates of the "post secular" - what it means and how we arrived here. This course will cover the politics of pluralism, differing church-state relations and religious debates on rights - of nature, sexuality, life, practice, sovereignty, and economic well-being.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 333: Law, Security, and Force in World Politics

An examination of traditional international legal principles involving the use of force in self-defense, with case studies required to understand how the justification of armed conflict is changing. Discussion of the international community's adjustment to the evolving nature of sovereignty, increasing globalization, and national defense.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 335: Comparative Governments and Politics

The main objective of GS 335: Comparative Governments and Politics (4 units) is to compare the dominant forms of government that have endured into the 21st century along with the political, economic histories, ideologies and institutions that have created them. The course emphasizes emerging powers particularly the rising influence of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) in the world. The political economic rise of emerging states, the changing nature of government, and related global political issues are examined.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 339S: Sweat/Service/Solidarity SL

Analyzes worker agency (class, race/ethnicity, gender, religion), forms of labor organizing and protest from historical, political economy, U.S. and global perspectives. It traces the development of labor organizing and union strategies in the industrial and post-industrial periods and today's global economy. Through real-life case studies, students earn upper-division service learning credits by servicing the needs of local labor unions and workers. (Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 6 — 6

GS 339: Sweat/Service/Solidarity

Analyzes worker agency (class, race/ethnicity, gender, place, religion), forms of labor organizing and protest from historical, political economy, U.S. and global perspectives. It traces the development of labor organizing and union strategies in the industrial and post-industrial periods in today's global economy.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 340: Social Media and Global Communication

Social networking technologies have brought with them new types of mediated interaction: collaboration and consumption. Students will think critically about the influence of social networking technologies on political events and government policies, cultural norms, and social movements. They will develop media literacy through immersion in various social cyberspaces.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 342: Economic Thought: History and Contemporary Interpretations

Explores political economy from historical, critical, global, and feminist perspectives. Students analyze relationships among economic systems and institutions, as well as cultural, political and social institutions, and a wide array of ideologies. Issues addressed include global economic crises, labor activism, labor migration, government, global civil society, poverty and inequality, imperialism and war, and cultural transformations. (Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

GS 343: Global Film and Film Industries

The proliferation of film industries throughout the globe has challenged the west's grip on representing the 'other' through cinema. Students will analyze films, television shows, and soap operas from the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. The course will also examine the economics of these film industries including the rise of Nollywood, and of 'media cities' throughout the Middle East.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 345: Global Political Theory and Philosophy

Introduces students to selected political practice, theories and philosophies and discusses how, where, and when they have influenced intellectual thought and cultural practices in the past and the present. Explores political philosophies from different parts of the world and connects them to relative climates of social diversity, political dissent, and religious tolerance. Examines the relationship between political thought and the problem of identification-individual, cultural, and national.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 349: The West and Arab and Muslim World - Soliya Connect

The Soliya Connect Program uses the latest web-conferencing technology to bridge the gap between university students in the Middle East, North Africa, Europe and the United States. Through dialogue, students discuss culture and everyday life and controversial topics ultimately arriving at a better understanding of other cultures and perspectives. A media module on current events is the final project.

Units: 2 — 4

GS 350: Global Gender Issues

How are gender roles and sexual hierarchies produced, reinforced, and challenged in local and transnational contexts? We consider how global capitalism, religion, and cultural politics affect beauty, love, reproduction, and labor and will evaluate the effects and discourse of multicultural transnational feminist and sexual rights movements. The goal of this class is to familiarize you with some key debates and to engage you in critical discussion. Focus on Global South.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 351: Global Econ: Theory & Ethics

This intermediate-level course covers two components: 1. the fundamental principles of neoclassical micro and macro economics; 2. the global, gender and inter-disciplinary perspectives to examine the values and critique the assumptions of neoclassical framework. Focusing on ethical implications, we examine real-life applications, case studies and responses from feminist, Global South, informal economy, environmentalist, and other alternative perspectives.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 355: Feminism and Militarism

Working with gender theories of the body, nation, and militarized culture this course considers US and international feminist perspectives on militarism and peace activism. We will look at analyses, histories, current debates, and activist strategies for peace including antiwar activism, efforts at globalizing women's rights discourse through UN mechanisms relating to peace building, and international criminal tribunals, and films that engage these questions from perspectives inside and outside.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 360: Relig'n/Violence/Peacemaking

Considers cases and theories of religious violence and inter-religious conflict, particularly Christian, Jewish, and Muslim; reflecting on ethno and religious nationalism, and terrorism. The course considers religious peace-building, sources for reconciliation, theological arguments for nonviolence, and the role of religious actors in protracted conflicts.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 362: Global Literatures

Examines intercultural communications through a global/historical lens that encompasses encounters in colonial, post-colonial, and global contexts. A series of novels, essays, and short stories are read in which the authors project their sense of individual and collective identities formed through the diverse experiences of globalization Examines relationships between author/audience and student/text in a cross-cultural dialog. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 4 — 4

GS 370: Global Political Economy

Examines origins of global economy. Analyzes and evaluates the interrelationship among global, political, and economic conditions. Studies global economy through 1) historical development, 2) current patterns of changes, 3) effects of globalization on the quality of life, 4) solutions and alternatives to inequity, and 5) the students' place in the global economy. Examines major structures, processes, and effects of evolving global economy.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 375: Ecological Political Economy

Introduces students to core concepts of ecological political economy that focus on interrelationships between humans and nature in a non-heirarchial manner. ecological political economy approach to planetary resources, their distribution, allocation, and concentration. Considers perspectives on the global commons beyond the jurisdiction of nation-states, international agreements, and institutions. Analyzes alternative accounts of Northern ecological debt and Southern ecological credit.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 376: US Political Economy

Introduces the workings of the U.S. economy in political and global context. Examines recent changes in income and wealth distribution, as well as economic policies and shifts in power fueling the growing divide between rich and poor. Examines the decline of organized labor, conditions of work, executive excess, defective corporations, and indefinite war. Shows how ordinary citizens have been reclaiming polluted, bankrupt communities, resources, and human dignity.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 379: Ethics of Corporate Social Responsibility

Students explore the ethics and responsibilities of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), a western concept applied globally since the 1990s. Historical contexts and events that gave rise to this corporate response to public concerns about labor standards and working environment are examined in multiple perspectives and case studies. CSR intent to enhance business-society relations is measured against realities in the workplace and NGO standards on workers and the environment in global economy. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

GS 380S: Building an Int'l NGO

Students explore interactions among inter-governmental organizations, non-governmental organizations, and grassroots organizations working locally and across borders on current issues of local and global import. Students examine various types and categories of international organizations and apply practical knowledge gained through service learning at local organizations to building mock international NGOs, from the ground up, in teams. (Prereq: Junior or Senior Standing)

Units: 6 — 6

GS 385: Global Ecology

Integrates study of earth systems with social systems by examining global natural and social systems. Combines perspectives, concepts, and methods of physical, biological, and social sciences in a holistic analysis and evaluation of issues related to resource access, use, pollution, and conservation by human communities locally and globally.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 390: Global Politics

Introduces students to the main political concepts and ideologies of global politics. Explores the global realm of: 1) interstate and transnational political relations; 2) Western and non-Western schools of thought about international politics; 3) gendered discourses of international relations including contributions from women, especially Global South; 4) environmental politics; and 5) the structure and role of intergovernmental organizations and 6) global security discourses.

Units: 4 — 4

GS 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Global Studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

GS 396: Field Studies

Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Global Studies.

Units: 1 — 6

GS 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

GS 400: Capstone Proposal Seminar

Students research and develop a capstone proposal. They will complete major elements of a graduation e-portfolio. The portfolio provides evidence that a student is making satisfactory progress toward meeting Global Studies Major Learning Outcomes.

Units: 2 — 2

GS 401: Capstone Seminar

Students synthesize, research, and write a Capstone project that integrates: 1) course-based and experiential learning completed for the major; 2) a major research paper that demonstrates knowledge of theoretical, methodological, and philosophical undercurrent of intellectual production in Global Studies. (Prereq: GS 400: Capstone Proposal Seminar (2 units))

Units: 2 — 2

GS 403: Directed Reading

Student and faculty member in consultation select topic of study, reading list, and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

GS 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in global studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

GS 596: Field Studies

Individualizes student placement for field study as related to global studies.

Units: 1 — 6

GS 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6