First Year Seminar courses

FYS 100: First Year Seminar

Provides an introduction to academic life at CSUMB and a foundation to learning as a lifelong process. Students identify the knowledge, skills, and abilities they will need to meet their personal, social, academic, and professional goals. As students meet course goals and outcomes, they start their transition to university life. Required for all entering first-year students and transfers with 29 or fewer semester units. Students should enroll in this course during their first semester at CSUMB. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 2 — 6

FYS 124: Introduction to Environmental Science

This interdisciplinary introduction to environmental science course introduces science as a method of studying and understanding the natural world through offering an overview of topics needed to understand key environmental challenges of today's world. Promotes critical thinking, problem solving, scientific and environmental literacy. Not open to students with credit in ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science (4 units). (Prereq: MATH 98: Mathematics Review I (4 units) or ELMT 46 or above)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 142: Youth and Protest in the Arts

Students examine the power of contemporary art to provoke change, challenge inequalities, and provide commentary on global and local conflicts. The role of artists as agents of change, and students own personal and cultural histories are also studied. A first year seminar, the course integrates these topics with orientation, academic planning and creative practice to support student success in the university. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 143: Philosophy of Nonviolence

The purpose of this class is twofold: 1) to introduce students to the academic model used at CSUMB, and, 2) to introduce students to the theory, philosophy, and practice of nonviolence and how that strategy has brought about significant cultural change from South Africa in the early 20th century to Egypt in the 21st Century. Through an examination of the Core Values, Vision Statement, Academic Goals, Major Fields, and potential career pathways, students create an academic plan for the first two years of study. Students also learn about the philosophy, principles, and methods of nonviolence to see how that practice has brought about social change for millions of persecuted, oppressed, and marginalized people in various cultural and global settings throughout the world. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 144: Art, Religion and the Americas

This course explores religious expression and cultural art forms of the Americas. Students learn interdisciplinary academic methods examining diverse genres of creative representation showing dynamic relationships among self, art, and culture. Case studies focus on contemporary cultural contexts of the Americas, cultivating critical perspectives and values of religious representation, collaborative research on diverse cultures, creative expression, multi-media resources, and current issues. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 145: Digital Media Arts & Culture

This section of First Year Seminar uses the cultural and technical framework of digital media (like manga, anime, video games and digital animation) to reference the core concepts of life as a new university student. Multicultural, rich in tradition and on the cutting edge of technology and creativity, these new forms of media are an integral part of the student's cultural awareness and make for a vibrant, relevant and provocative environment for academic exploration and personal growth. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 146: Comp. Ethnic Experiences

Using texts from several genres including short stories and poems, as well as film and other cultural forms, students examine ethnic American experiences. Students explore how human experiences may be mediated by social differences, and how affinities between ethnic groups are rendered visible when we approach works comparatively. A first year seminar, the course integrates these topics with orientation, academic planning and skill development to support student success in the university. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 156: Technology and Society

This FYS course will focus on the nature and impact of technology on society, paying particular attention to computing while using previous technological advances as a basis for comparison. We will consider the social, political, historic, economic and philosophic contexts that both shaped and have been shaped by technological change. Students will explore the emerging field of technology and society studies and will learn techniques borrowed from sociology, psychology, and philosophy. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 158: Archaeology/Sustainability

Sustainability in prehistory and non-Western traditions constitutes the scope of this archaeological survey and project-based learning lab centered on the evidence for sustainable practices in and beyond the American hemisphere. In sum, we explore just how past cultural practices differ from or align with contemporary approaches to sustainability? And ask, what does archaeology reveal about the successes, limitations, and failures of past human efforts to generate sustainable practices? (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 6

FYS 159: Far East Explorer

Do you like to travel? Why do people become tourists? Is tourism positive or negative? What is the relationship between tourism hosts and visitors? With a particular focus on tourism practices in Japan and other Asian countries, this course explores the global phenomenon of tourism by analyzing international tourism and cross-cultural encounters, and their impacts on cultures, peoples, and environments. This course is designed to develop fundamental academic skills for students' success at CSUMB. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 181: Multicultural Health

An introduction to CSUMB's vision and academic life, this course focuses on sexuality, drugs and other health-related behaviors, as they impact knowledge, decision-making and well-being. It is anticipated that this course will expand students' awareness and appreciation of health and well-being, help them to negotiate CSUMB's academic world and vision, instill in them a broader understanding of diversity and differing perspectives, and develop their academic skills and achievement. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 182: Sex, Drugs and Rock n Roll

First Year Seminar (FYS) is an introduction to CSUMB's vision and academic life and fulfills the Lower-Division Area E and FYS outcomes. This course is tailored to focus on sexuality, drugs and other health-related behaviors, as they impact knowledge, decision-making and well-being. It is anticipated that this course will expand students' awareness and appreciation of health and well-being, help them to negotiate CSUMB's academic world and vision, instill in them a broader understanding of diversity and differing perspectives, and develop their academic skills and achievement. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4

FYS 183: Eat, Love, Learn

Students receive an introduction to CSUMB while exploring concepts of well-being, applying theoretical models to personal engagement in behaviors that promote and detract from well-being. Students use evolutionary and neurobiological models to develop health and well being around eating, loving, and learning. (Freshman Standing)

Units: 4 — 4