Environmental Sci, Technology & Policy courses

ENVS 101: Energy and Sustainability

This problem-based learning course consists of a series of independent projects that focus on the interaction between energy, sustainability, and the environment. Each project is designed as a hands-on, collaborative inquiry where students are presented with a challenge and key question. Each semester-long course consists of 3 to 6 of these projects. One project each semester is focused exclusively on solving a major challenge in the campus climate action plan.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 105: Climate Science

Students will learn how the climate system works; what factors cause climate to change across different time scales and how those factors interact; how scientists use models, observations and theory to make predictions about future climate. The course explores evidence for changes in sea level and acidity due to global warming. Finally, the course looks at the connection between human activity and the current warming trend and considers some of the potential consequences of climate change.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 197: Independent Study

Independent study for first-year students. Students must obtain the signature/approval of their independent study supervisor before enrolling in ENVS 197: Independent Study (1-6 units).

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science

This interdisciplinary introduction to environmental science course introduces science as a method of studying and understanding the natural world through offering an overview of topics needed to understand key environmental challenges of today's world. Promotes critical thinking, problem solving, scientific and environmental literacy. For non-science majors and Environmental Studies majors.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 272: The Atmosphere

Introduction to the chemical and physical nature of the atmosphere. Topics include weather and climate, storms, general air circulation, descriptive meteorology, clouds, and atmosphere-ocean interactions.

Units: 2 — 2

ENVS 282: Mtry Bay:Case Sty Env Sci &Pol

Introduction to the major physical, chemical, biological, and geological features and processes of global oceanography, with emphasis on the Monterey Bay area. Discusses the human impacts on the region and the state and federal policies in-place that have been designed to protect the Monterey Bay area through the establishment of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. For non-science majors.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 284: Envi Econ & Management

Covers principles of microeconomics and applies these to environmental valuation and management of natural resources. Students apply economic theory to evaluate environmental problems and policies, particularly in marine and coastal ecosystems. [Prereq: (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) and ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science (4 units) or FYS 124: Introduction to Environmental Science (4 units) and STAT 100: Introduction to Statistics (3 units)) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)]

Units: 2 — 2

ENVS 295: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Prereq: GE Area A1)

Units: 1 — 4

ENVS 297: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits. [Prereq: (MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units) or BIO 240 or GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units) or ENVS 280 or ENVS 283) and (ENVS 284: Envi Econ & Management (2 units)) and (Include Junior and Senior)]

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science

Students develop a research-driven, scientifically rigorous case study that includes a theory section with hypotheses students test as part of their research. A robust literature review and interviews of external stakeholders completed by students inform the case study. Lectures, critical thinking exercises, readings on the scientific method, analyses of exemplary case studies, and resources and activities on effective written and oral communication provide students with a framework. [Prereq: (GE Areas A1 and A2 and A3) and (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 240) and (ENVS 283 or GE Area D2) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 300L: Read Write Crit Think ENVS Lab

Optional computer lab course for ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units). Designed for students in ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) who have not previously fulfilled the Tech/Info ULR. Provides hands-on experience with information literacy and literature searches, reference evaluation, advanced word processing, electronic presentations, spreadsheet design and manipulation, and webpage development. (Coreq: BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units) or ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

ENVS 303: Calif Transect Orientation

Mandatory orientation for ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units). This classroom component of California Transect prepares students for the summer field course (ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units)) by introducing topics in California's scientific, cultural, and political history and current issues that will be examined in detail during the summer field course (ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units)). May require one weekend field trip. [Prereq: (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units)) and (Coreq: ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab (3 units))]

Units: 2 — 2

ENVS 303L: California Transect Lab

Two-week summer field course. Students explore California's unique ecosystems and landscapes using a case-studies framework emphasizing the interaction between natural processes and human impacts. Involves camping and hiking. Course fee charged for food, transportation, and camping. (Coreq: ENVS 303: Calif Transect Orientation (2 units))

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 315: Soils and the Environment

Soils and the Environment: Lecture/lab course surveys the importance, composition, and formation of soils; soil chemistry, mineralogy, and organic matter; soil physical properties and water movement and retention; soil biology and microbiology; soil fertility and plant growth; reactions and movement of nutrients, trace metals, and pesticides in soils; factors influencing soil erosion and salinization; and soil taxonomy and surveys. [Prereq: (ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or MSCI 300: Marine Science, Communication, & Policy (4 units) or ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) or BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units)) and GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units)]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS

Theory and application of spatial data acquisition, analysis, and display using an integrated, hands-on, project-based approach. Covers geographic information systems (GIS) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Course completion results in GPS Mapping certification from Trimble Navigation. (Prereq: STAT 100: Introduction to Statistics (3 units) or STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods

Project-oriented course covers techniques in statistics, experimental design, and field methodology to characterize the ecological patterns in local ecosystems. Field-intensive course. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (Prereq or Coreq: ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or MSCI 300: Marine Science, Communication, & Policy (4 units) or BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 355: Environmental Monitoring

Project-oriented course covers techniques in experimental design, data analysis, and field and laboratory methods of soil and water analysis in the context of local soil and water chemistry problems. May include one or more weekend field trips. [Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) or GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 370: Environmental Wildlands Studies

Environmental Wildlands Studies: Field investigations study of environmental problems affecting natural and human-impacted ecosystems, including the role of human interactions. Extended field study of flora, fauna, biotic communities, and ecological relationships at selected sites in the United States or international locations. Students participate in field research and evaluation of environmental policy options.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 371: Environmental Field Survey

Environmental Field Survey: Field based course that conducts onsite examinations and analyses of environmental problems affecting North American/international wildlands and wildlife populations. Concepts and principles of environmental studies, wildlife management and public land planning methods are incorporated during assessment of the study area's environmental characteristics. Data collection techniques, quantification and analysis of field data, and environmental report writing are components of the research activities that students will pursue.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 372: Wildlands Environment&Culture

Wildlands Environment&Culture: Field Studies course involves off-campus travel to a variety of locations, studying the relationships among people and the environment. Region and culture specific case studies and assessment of historical and current cultural and environmental uses of wildland and/or wildlife communities. Examination of consequences and outcomes of environmental policies and wildland/wildlife management.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 394: Junior Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires critical thinking and specialized science, policy, or technical skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes.

Units: 2 — 4

ENVS 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Earth Systems Science & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

ENVS 397S: Independent Study

Students work with public and private organizations on projects that integrate scientific skills with needs of multicultural communities.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 402: Honors Capstone Seminar II

Assists students in completion of faculty-guided Honors Capstone research project. Requires A- or above in both ENVS 400 and ENVS 495: Special Topics (1-6 units). [Prereq: (ENVS 400 and ENVS 495: Special Topics (1-6 units))(A- or Above)]

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 403: Capstone Seminar II

Assists students in completing the Capstone project developed in ENVS 400, including a written Capstone report and an oral presentation to faculty and students associated with the ESTP Program. (Prereq: ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units))

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 436: Rmt Sns/Image Process

Applications of geospatial information technology and geodata manipulation and analysis in the management of natural resources, including remote sensing, aerial photography, image processing, georeferencing, georecertification, and quantitative information extraction from multispectral and other image data. (Prereq: ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 440: Environmental Modeling

Process of designing, building, and using computer models for use within applied environmental science. Covers key examples within ecological and hydrological modeling. Introduces students to different modeling paradigms, including: systems dynamics, statistical habitat selection, and simulated vs analytical solutions. Software usage draws from Stella, Excel, and the R programming language. Individual student projects. [Prereq: MATH 151: Calculus II (4 units) and (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) or GEOL 360: Geomorphic Systems (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 441: Global Biogeochemical Cycles

Use of landscape-level measurements, computer models, remote sensing, and geographic information systems to quantify and develop sustainable solutions to environmental problems over large space and time scales. Utilize an ecosystem process model as a tool to understanding how changes in the cycling of biogeochemicals can alter ecosystem processes. [Prereq: MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units) and (BIO 342: Plant Communities of CA (4 units) or BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) or ENVS 315: Soils and the Environment (4 units)) and GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units)]

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 446: Landscape Ecology

Theory and methods of landscape-level research, analysis, and management. Methods for detecting and characterizing landscape patterns; causes of landscape patterns; mechanisms by which landscape patterns change through time; implications of landscape patterns for populations, communities, and ecosystems; strategies for conservation and management issues at a landscape scale. Students read, discuss, and analyze scientific literature in landscape ecology and apply the quantitative tools. [Prereq: (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units)) and (Prereq or Coreq: ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units) or MSCI 350: Quantitative Marine Science (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 475: Projects in Natural Resource Management

Applied group capstone course focused on collecting and analyzing data to address natural resource management issues on local public lands. Course will include discussion of relevant regulations and management issues. Course may focus on ephemeral wetland, grassland, chaparral or dune ecosystems depending on the needs of local resource managers. Field-intensive course. [Prereq: BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and ENVS 332: Intro to GIS/GPS (4 units) and (ENVS 350: Quantitative Field Methods (4 units) or ENVS 355: Environmental Monitoring (4 units)) and (ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units) or MSCI 300: Marine Science, Communication, & Policy (4 units) or ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 483: Environmental Impact Assessment

The theory and practice of environmental impact assessment and analysis. The process of preparing environmental documents (such as EAs, EISs, and EIRs) as mandated by state and federal statutes and regulations under NEPA and CEQA. Application of environmental assessment in urban, regional, and land use planning contexts. Processes of public participation and comment. Litigation and environmental mediation. [(Prereq: (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and (ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units) or ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units) or BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units) or MSCI 300: Marine Science, Communication, & Policy (4 units)) and (Coreq: ENVS 483L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab (1 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 497S: Independent Study

Enables students to integrate citizenship, academic subjects, skills, and values into their Senior Capstone projects. Students work with public and private organizations on projects that integrate scientific skills with needs of multicultural communities. Students maintain weekly journals covering self, community, public education, and professional community responsibility.

Units: 2 — 4

ENVS 500: Environmental Policy and Management

This graduate seminar focuses on the complex relationship between science and environmental policy and management. It takes a case-study approach to understanding the process of developing and approving environmental policy, and in identifying and comparing major stakeholders, their interests, and their roles in the development and approval of policies that address current environmental problems.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 502: Scientific Writing

This graduate seminar assists students in developing scientific writing skills including thesis, research, and proposal writing.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 521: Create GIS Field Project

Walks educators through each step of creating their own GIS project. Participants gather data from a variety of sources, including GPS, and create a marine and coastal map that communicates a variety of issues. Issues can include marine protected areas, coastal development, invasive species, water quality, ocean observing systems, and marine fisheries. Participants also create a lesson plan to use with their interactive map.

Units: 2 — 3

ENVS 531: Bld Rem-Op Vhcls for Classroom

Provides a forum for educators, especially those interested in participating in MATE student ROV competitions, to: (1) acquire the knowledge and skills needed to implement an ROV design and building curriculum that is aligned with the country's workforce needs; (2) gain an understanding of the type of work that ROV technicians do; and (3) learn about the many career opportunities available in the submersible-technology field. (Offered through Extended Ed.)

Units: 2 — 3

ENVS 532: Advanced GIS&Spatial Analysis

Theory and application of advanced spatial data acquisition, analysis, and display using an integrated, hands-on, project-based approach. Use of geographic information systems (GIS) for spatial analysis, hypothesis testing, and decision making. Theory and practice of advanced GIS topics and methods such as raster analysis, dynamic segmentation, geocoding, spatial statistics, and geodatabase design.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 536: Remote Sns & Image Process

Applications of geospatial information technology and geodata manipulation and analysis in the management of natural resources, including remote sensing, aerial photography, image processing, georeferencing, georecertification, and quantitative information extraction from multispectral and other image data.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 540: Environmental Modeling

Teaches the process of designing, building, and using computer models for use within applied environmental science. Covers key examples within ecological and hydrological modeling e.g. population dynamics, and water flow. Introduces students to different modeling paradigms, including: systems dynamics, statistical habitat selection, and simulated vs analytical solutions. Software usage draws from Stella, Excel, and R programming language. Includes individual student projects.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 546: Landscape Ecology

Theory and methods of landscape-level research, analysis, and management. Methods for detecting and characterizing landscape patterns; causes of landscape patterns; mechanisms by which landscape patterns change through time; implications of landscape patterns for populations, communities, and ecosystems; strategies for conservation and management issues at a landscape scale. Students read, discuss, and analyze scientific literature in landscape ecology and apply the quantitative tools. [(Prereq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units)) or (Coreq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 550: Research Methods

Covers the key elements of applied scientific research, including data management, analytical software, scientific method, designing research questions, experimental design, statistical analysis & inference under multiple paradigms, communication of scientific results, and selected advanced analytical techniques. Emphasizes effective linkage between science and policy.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 560: Watershed Systems

Develops interdisciplinary skills to address complex environmental issues. Skill sets will be in the fields of hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, water quality, and ecology. Topics include environmental policy/agency framework, current environmental issues, and physical/ecological processes in natural and impacted watershed systems. May require weekend field trips.

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 561: Watershed Systems Restoration

Explores the rehabilitation and management of damaged ecosystems focusing on rivers, estuaries, and wetlands. Covers the systems approach, ecologic principles, hydrologic processes, soils, erosion, and improvement structures. Emphasizes real situations using case studies and experimental restoration work. Includes several weekend field trips.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 575: Projects in Natural Resource Management

Applied project-oriented course focused on collecting and analyzing data to address natural resource management issues on local public lands. Course will include discussion of relevant regulations and management issues. Course may focus on ephemeral wetland, grassland, chaparral or dune ecosystems depending on the needs of local resource managers. Field-intensive course. (Prereq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units) and ENVS 560: Watershed Systems (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

ENVS 580: Environmental and Resource Economics

Course explores concepts of negative externalities as drivers of environmental problems and conflict in common pool resources. Students examine fundamental microeconomic principles including benefit-cost analysis, marginal net benefits, rational choice theory, inter-temporal distribution of net benefits, and institutional analysis framework via a case study approach.

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 583: Environmental Impact Assessment

The theory and practice of environmental impact assessment and analysis. The process of preparing environmental documents (such as EAs, EISs, and EIRs) as mandated by state and federal statutes and regulations under NEPA and CEQA. Application of environmental assessment in urban, regional, and land use planning contexts. Processes of public participation and comment. Litigation and environmental mediation.  (Coreq: ENVS 583L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab (1 units))

Units: 3 — 3

ENVS 583L: Environmental Impact Assessment Lab

Field methods, sampling techniques, and visits to local projects that support environmental assessment. (Coreq: ENVS 583: Environmental Impact Assessment (3 units))

Units: 1 — 1

ENVS 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 0 — 6

ENVS 595L: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Environmental Science Technology & Policy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 596: Field Studies

Individualizes student placement for field study as related to Environmental Science, Technology and Policy.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 599: Masters Thesis

Faculty-mentored, independent research leading toward completion of the MS thesis. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits that count toward the degree. Requires approval of the thesis advisor.

Units: 1 — 6

ENVS 660: Adv Watershed Sci & Policy

Addresses current watershed environmental issues using advanced research methods and sound science. Students work in teams to complete applied research projects addressing real-world problems. Considers issues from multiple perspectives, including legal, political, diverse stakeholders, and natural science. Students present project results in both written and oral formats, utilizing innovative visualizations, as necessary, to communicate technical science to decision-makers or non-specialists.

Units: 4 — 4