Biology courses

BIO 195: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 204: Introduction to Life Science

An introduction to biomolecules, the structure and function of living cells, cell cycle, reproduction, evolution, and the diversity of organisms. Designed for Liberal Studies majors and science majors who need additional biology background to succeed in majors-level biology courses. [Prereq: GE Area B4]

Units: 3 — 4

BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab

The goals for this laboratory course are to develop a sound understanding and practice of laboratory safety and laboratory science, to expose students to the major techniques used in molecular biology laboratories, and to gain hands-on experience exploring the form and function of major animal organ systems. This course may have a lab fee. (Coreq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology

First semester of a two-semester core biology series. Examines cell structure and function; cellular respiration and photosynthesis; cell signaling and reproduction; transmission and molecular genetics, transcription and translation; control of gene expression; biotechnology; comparative animal form and function; animal development. Enrollment conditional upon pre-assessment score, AP Biology exam score 4, or completion of BIO 204: Introduction to Life Science (3-4 units). Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) allowed if A- in CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units). [(Prereq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units)) and (Coreq: BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab (1 units) or prior completion)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants

This is the second semester of the two-semester core biology sequence. Examines the diversity of life, the evolutionary processes that unites all life, the form and function of higher plants, and the ecological processes that govern the interactions of living and non-living components of the earth. These concepts will be grounded in an exploration of local biology and global climate change. [Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) and (GE Area A1) and (Coreq: BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab

Required lab course for BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units). Focuses on biodiversity, evolution, plant biology and doing scientific research in ecology and plant physiology. Lab course fee may be charged. (Coreq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 230: Environmental Biology

This course focuses on the conservation of biodiversity, evolutionary processes that affect conservation and restoration, and the ecological concepts that underlie many environmental issues. These concepts will be grounded in issues in sustainability with a focus on climate change. In addition, the systems nature of environmental issues will be woven through the course. Lab course fee may be charged. [Prereq: GE Area A1 and (MATH 130: Precalculus (5 units) or MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)) and (CHEM 109: Introductory Chemistry (4 units) or FYS 121 and ENVS 201: Intro to Environmental Science (4 units) or FYS 124: Introduction to Environmental Science (4 units)) or CHEM 110: Chemistry I (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 292: Professional Development for Scientists

This course is intended for students who will seek or are participating in undergraduate science internships. Students will explore opportunities for career development, create standard documents for applying to professional experiences, and develop their professional communication and networking skills. Students will also be introduced to campus services that support career development, including the Science Internship Program and the Career Development Center. (Letter Grade Available)

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 295: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Credit/No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology

Develops library research, writing, oral and critical analysis skills needed to link science to ethics in biology. Covers current issues that involve biology, ethics and society. Students develop a learning plan that integrates their Biology concentration, capstone and internship interests, and personal and professional goals. [Prereq: (Junior or Senior Standing) and (GE Area A1 and GE Area A2 and GE Area A3) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) or (BIO 242 or (Coreq: BIO 242)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 310: Biochemistry I

Covers biomolecular structure and function, biological oxidation and reduction, metabolism including respiration and photosynthesis, membrane transport, and biotransformation. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and (CHEM 210: Organic Chemistry for Biologists (4 units) or CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I (5 units) or CHEM 312: Organic Chemistry II (5 units))]

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 311: Genetics

This upper division course provides an in-depth, background in all areas of classic Mendelian genetics, population and evolutionary genetics, and molecular genetics. Students who successfully complete this course should be able to discuss and understand all of the above areas of genetics and have sufficient basic knowledge to successfully move on and master advanced topics in genetics. These outcomes will be achieved by learning how geneticists solve problems and make new discoveries. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and 210L) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 320: Microbiology

Introduces the biology of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, algae, fungi), their significance as model systems for understanding fundamental cellular processes, and their role in human affairs. Also introduces the biological properties of bacterial and animal viruses, replication, methods of detection, interactions with host cells and multicellular hosts. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 241)

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 322: Plant Pathology

Explores the biology and control of plant pathogens including fungi, bacteria, viruses, and nematodes. Topics covered will include differences in pathogen morphology, the phylogenetics of plant pathogens, host plant resistance, and the epidemiology of plant pathogens. Course fee may be required. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 332: Plant Physiology

Plant Physiology focuses on the structure and function of plants throughout their development from seeds through reproduction. Covers special plant adaptations, plant symbiotic relationships, hormones, nutrition, and biotic and abiotic plant stressors. Discussions and exercises will cover from the biochemical level through the organismal level with many practical examples in agricultural and ecological settings. (Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units))

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 340: Ecology

Introduces ecological concepts and theory by exploring the marine and terrestrial ecosystems of Monterey Bay. A systems approach teaches how organisms interact with one another and with the natural world around them. Emphasizes population, community, and ecosystem level ecology. [Prereq: (BIO 240 or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units)) and MATH 150: Calculus I (4 units)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 341: Evolution Bio & Pop Genetics

Overview and explanation of evolutionary processes, ranging from microevolutionary changes in allelic frequency due to mutation, genetic drift, gene flow and natural selection to macroevolutionary processes such as speciation, extinction and the evolution of biodiversity. (Prereq: BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units))

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 342: Plant Communities of CA

Surveys terrestrial ecosystems across California. Emphasizes the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the extents of these ecosystems. Plant identification and distribution in ecosystems of the Monterey Bay area. May include one or more weekend field trips. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 240) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) and GEOL 260: Geology/Hydrology (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 344L: Environmental Biotechnology

Laboratory course covering techniques for prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA purification, amplification, subcloning, and sequence analysis, used in the context of providing earth systems information. Additional knowledge and skills acquired include microbial cell culture, primer design, proposal writing. Lab course fee may be charged. [Prereq: (BIO 210: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology (4 units) and BIO 210L: Molecular and Cell Biology and Animal Physiology Lab (1 units)) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 345: Marine Biology

Examines the biology, biodiversity, classification, ecology, and habitats of the world's living marine organisms with an emphasis on Monterey Bay species, habitats, issues, and research. [Prereq: (PHYS 150: Physics for Biologists (4 units) or PHYS 220: Physics I (4 units) or PHYS 221: Physics II (4 units)) and (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) or BIO 240)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 347: Working with Marine Mammals

Explores current topics and careers working with marine mammals. Topics include practical knowledge of captive marine mammal husbandry (care and maintenance), training, basic physiology, an overview of common research topics and techniques, as well as public display, education, and current issues in marine mammalogy. Students intern at least one day at Moss Landing Marine Labs assisting in the care. (Offered through Extended Education.) (Prereq: BIO 204: Introduction to Life Science (3-4 units) or BIO 240)

Units: 3 — 4

BIO 348: Tech & Theory of Animal Train

Explores the field of animal training from a psychological and a technical perspective. Provides a theoretical background in relevant animal behavior and psychological principles related to the practical goal of modifying captive animal behavior. Topics include the history and ethics of animal use and training, and practical animal training techniques. Students intern at least one day at Moss Landing Marine Labs assisting in the care and training of research-trained sea lions. Fee charged for course materials. (Offered through Extended Education.)

Units: 3 — 4

BIO 360: Natural History of California Wildlife

Students learn about the ecology, evolution, and protection status of common or otherwise noteworthy mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish of central California. Lab/field components provide students with experience conducting wildlife surveys/research and aid development of field observation and identification skills. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) and ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 362: Field Ornithology

Field Ornithology introduces students to bird identification and field research techniques, and exposes them to broad concepts in avian biology. Lecture components of the course will cover avian diversity, evolutionary history, physiology, behavior, and ecology. Field and laboratory components of the course will train students in the practical application of standardized field methods, including census techniques, behavioral observations, and habitat measurements. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and BIO 211L: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants Lab (1 units)) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 364: Mammology

Concepts and skills related to the study of mammals. Lecture components (2 hours per week) will cover the origin, evolution, adaptation, biogeography, physiology, ecology, and behavior of mammals. Lab/field components (4 hours per week) will focus on the identification and classification of mammals and provide students with experience using standard field techniques to survey terrestrial mammals native to central California. Requires one or more weekend fieldtrips. [Prereq: (BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and 211L) or (BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units) and ENSTU 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Studies (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 378S: Health Sciences Service Learning

Through active work directly with people in medically underserved communities, students discover how class, ethnicity, language, and immigration status affect access to health care in the Monterey County. Through service, journaling, readings, and data analysis students will explore medical access issues and the factors that lead to social injustice and inequity. [Prereq: (GE Area A2 and GE Area A3 and GE Area B2) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 5 — 5

BIO 379S: Biology Service Learning

Addresses strategies for supporting equitable formal and informal educational opportunities and access to healthy natural environments for all, regardless of their cultural, linguistic, or economic background. Service learning placements in schools and other agencies help students deepen their understanding of basic biology principles and methodologies for facilitating learning by diverse students and community members. [Prereq: (GE Area A2 and GE Area A3 and GE Area B2) and (Junior or Senior Standing)]

Units: 5 — 5

BIO 380: Practical Computing for Scientists

This course will focus on developing the base tool set for implementing advanced computing in the design and analysis research projects. Content of the course is geared towards novice students (i.e. those with little or no previous programming experience) who will learn practical computational approaches to modern research questions by applying programming concepts and approaches to real data sets. Areas of study will focus on skills related to data manipulation, management, and analysis. [Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and [(BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units) and 211L) or BIO 230: Environmental Biology (4 units)]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 392: Biology Seminar Series

Upper division seminar course based on lectures from visiting faculty and biology professionals from Research 1 institutions, biotechnology, and other biology-related careers. Includes reading and critical analysis of peer reviewed literature, seminar and journal club discussion, and attendance in seminar series. May be repeated for credit up to three times. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units))

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 394: Biology Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires biology skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes. (Prereq: BIO 211: Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity and Plants (4 units))

Units: 1 — 3

BIO 395: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 397: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 410: Bioinformatics

Emphasizes modern genomics focused on basic and applied questions involving human genome biology and genomics for drug development and agricultural application. Students will learn to conduct bioinformatic analysis using data from genomic research projects of different species. (Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) and BIO 380: Practical Computing for Scientists (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 412: Comparative Genomics

This course will explore the area of genomics and its relationship to both basic and applied areas of research. Students will learn about the applications and contributions of a "genomic" perspective to topics such as evolutionary biology, functional genetics, genetic structure, and systems biology. (Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units))

Units: 3 — 3

BIO 413: Molecular Genetics

A comprehensive molecular genetics course for majors covering DNA replication, repair and mutation, regulation of transcription and translation, and analysis and manipulation of genes at the molecular level. (Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 414: Molecular Cell Biology

Cell structure, membrane transport, cell division, molecular genetics, recombinant DNA, mechanisms of evolution, and the basis of classification. Applies fundamental principles and experimental approaches in four areas of cell biology: cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, intracellular protein transport, and structure and function of cytoskeleton, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. Explores recent advances in the fields of molecular and cell biology. (Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 420: Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Advanced survey of the biology of invertebrates, stressing comparative functional morphology, evolution, phylogeny, systematics, natural history, behavior, and aspects of physiology and development. Emphasizes the living animal and its habitat. (Prereq: BIO 345: Marine Biology (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 425: Systematic and Molecular Mycology

Examines the diverse world of fungi in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungi are ecologically and economically important decomposers, symbionts and pathogens. Introduces current fungal research topics (e.g. pathogenicity) and explore both next generation sequencing technologies for the analysis of fungal diversity, growth and virulence mechanisms. [Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) and (BIO 320: Microbiology (4 units) or BIO 322: Plant Pathology (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 430: Marine Experimental Physiology

This course uses a group project approach to address a real-world marine environmental physiology problem. This course will increase knowledge retention and integration of concepts in marine science, physiology and biology, and teach students what it is like to work in a research laboratory setting. Includes group capstone project option. [Prereq: STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units) and (MSCI 331: Ecological Physiology (4 units) or BIO 330: Vertebrate Physiology (3 units)) and (BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units) or MSCI 300: Marine Science, Communication, & Policy (4 units) or ENVS 300: Critical Thinking & Communication in Environmental Science (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 444: Molecular Ecology & Evolution

Students will learn to apply molecular laboratory and analytical methods to questions in the fields of ecology and evolution and use these methods to execute and present a research project. (Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) or 341)

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 448: Aquatic Ecology

In-depth exploration of freshwater and estuarine ecosystems, including aquatic organisms and their taxonomy, and the ecology, geochemistry, and sediments of freshwater ecosystems. Will include weekend or odd-hour field trips with concurrent field/laboratory section. [Prereq: CHEM 111: Chemistry II (4 units) and (BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) or BIO 342: Plant Communities of CA (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 449: Community Ecology

This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of concepts examining how species interactions shape the structure and composition of plant and animal communities. Lecture covers topics on species interactions such as competition, predation, herbivory, and mutualism, as well as principle theories explaining coexistence and species diversity. Discussion explores classic and modern literature representative of research in the field, with an emphasis on communities in California. (Prereq: BIO 340: Ecology (4 units) and STAT 250: Applied Stat:Sci Tech (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 461: Eukaryotic Molecular Biology

Advanced project-based lab and lecture course develops skills and understanding of current techniques in eukaryotic genetics and molecular biology. Six hours lab and two hours lecture per week. [(Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units)) or (Coreq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 472: California Flora

Uses taxonomy and systematics of higher plants of California with a focus on morphology, development, and other characteristics to classify plants. (Prereq: BIO 342: Plant Communities of CA (4 units))

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 491: Biology Research Capstone

Assists students in completing their biology research capstone project. These projects are independent in nature, and should be approved by the capstone course instructor and your research mentor prior to enrollment. The student's research mentor may have been on the CSUMB campus, or as a summer REU on another campus, or research at an associated research agency or institution. (Prereq: BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units))

Units: 2 — 4

BIO 492: Course-Based Capstone

Assists students enrolled in a capstone project course in preparing their final written report, poster, and/or oral presentation for their Senior Capstone Project. Students must have completed an approved Biology Capstone Project Course prior to enrolling in BIO 492: Course-Based Capstone (1-2 units). [Prereq: BIO 300: Issues & Ethics in Biology (4 units) and (BIO 320: Microbiology (4 units) or BIO 410: Bioinformatics (4 units) or BIO 430: Marine Experimental Physiology (4 units) or BIO 448: Aquatic Ecology (4 units) or BIO 461: Eukaryotic Molecular Biology (4 units) or MSCI 430: Marine Experimental Physiology (4 units))]

Units: 1 — 2

BIO 493: Biology Test-based Capstone

The major outcome of this capstone is for a student to study for and satisfactorily complete an approved standardized test that has a biology focus. Students can take the DAT, OAT or MCAT, or GRE subject exam in Biochemistry and Cell Biology or Biology, or one of approved Biology sections of the CSET. The choice in exam is dependent upon a student's career goals. [Prereq: BIO 311: Genetics (4 units) and (BIO 341: Evolution Bio & Pop Genetics (3 units) or BIO 330: Vertebrate Physiology (3 units))]

Units: 1 — 1

BIO 494: Biology Internship

Students work with practicing professionals in the community in a volunteer or paid internship that requires biology knowledge and skills. Academic credit is awarded for documented learning that takes place during the internship and that meets individualized and core internship outcomes.

Units: 2 — 4

BIO 495: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (Credit/ No Credit Available)

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 497: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 541: Mar Biotech&Bioinform forTeach

Designed to mimic the research cycle in a typical molecular biology laboratory. Students isolate DNA from marine organisms, amplify specific regions, subclone, and purify plasmid DNA. Bioinformatic techniques are used to analyze sequenced regions, including homology searches, multiple alignments, primer design, and 3D comparison. Assessment consists of a lab notebook review, a final exam, and a detailed standards-based lesson plan. (Offered through Extended Education.) (Coreq: BIO 541L)

Units: 2 — 4

BIO 548: Aquatic Ecology

Graduate-level lecture course designed for an in-depth exploration of aquatic and wetland ecosystems. Learning activities include lectures on the major patterns and processes influence various aquatic systems, i.e. streams, lakes, wetlands, and estuaries; a literature review on one particular aquatic ecosystem; and oral presentation to the class about the system.

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 549: Community Ecology

This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of concepts examining how species interactions shape the structure and composition of plant and animal communities. Lecture covers topics on species interactions such as competition, predation, herbivory, and mutualism, as well as principle theories explaining coexistence and species diversity. Discussion explores classic and modern literature representative of research in the field, with an emphasis on communities in California. [(Prereq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units)) or (Coreq: ENVS 550: Research Methods (4 units))]

Units: 4 — 4

BIO 595: Special Topics

Studies a particular topic in Biology. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

Units: 1 — 4

BIO 597: Independent Study

Student and faculty member select topic of study and number of credits.

Units: 1 — 4